Articles on lockout laws

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Processes of data collection and analysis being used to decide policy need to be as independent and transparent as possible, particularly on issues as contentious as Sydney’s lockout laws. Subel BhandariEPA/AAP

Sydney lockout laws review highlights vital role of transparent data analysis

The collection and analysis of data used for making policy should be independent and open to ensure public trust in decision-making. The debate over alcohol licensing shows why this matters.
Fortitude Valley is unique in Australia for its concentration of live music venues, like The Valley Drive In, in one small neighbourhood. The Valley Drive In/Facebook

Tighter alcohol licensing hasn’t killed live music, but it’s harder for emerging artists

The good news is that the growth of live music continued under Queensland's liquor licensing reforms. The bad news is that venues rely on late-night alcohol sales to cover costs.
In one regard, lockout laws have succeeded in decreasing crime. But take a step back to see a city-wide perspective, and there are many other issues to consider. shutterstock

Where are they now? What public transport data reveal about lockout laws and nightlife patronage

Policy changes such as the 'lockout laws' have had profound impacts on inner Sydney nightlife. Transport data help us see whether these have caused problems to spill over into neighbouring areas.
In Queensland, police can issue on-the-spot ten-day banning orders to patrons who engage in violent or anti-social behaviour in and around licensed venues. AAP/Dan Peled

Banning orders won’t solve alcohol-fuelled violence – but they can be part of the solution

Banning orders can encourage personal responsibility and demonstrate that anti-social behaviour will not be tolerated.
Sydney’s Kings Cross and CBD are safer as a result of the lockout measures, but it has come at a cost to the precincts’ ‘vibrancy’. AAP/April Fonti

Callinan review largely backs Sydney lockout laws, but alcohol’s role in family violence is a blind spot

A review of Sydney's lockout laws found the objective of reducing alcohol- and drug-related assaults and anti-social behaviour remain valid, and the measures introduced are achieving this.
The regulation of drinking has helped create precisely the violent, misogynistic and law-breaking culture that it was intended to control. John Brack/Wikimedia Commons

Curfews and lockouts: battles over drinking time have a long history in NSW

Since the earliest days of British colonisation, authorities have sought to limit the problems associated with alcohol by licensing its sale and limiting the times and places where it is drunk.
When public housing like the properties in Sydney’s Millers Point is privatised, it profoundly changes the social mix of the inner city to something much more homogenous. AAP/Newzulu/Peter Boyle

Suburbanising the centre: the Baird government’s anti-urban agenda for Sydney

The NSW government agenda would deny the 'right to the city', that network of diverse communities, practices and places which give rise to the convivial and inclusive potential of cities.

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