Articles on Melatonin

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Getting a baby to fall asleep can be exhausting. Marcos Mesa Sam Wordley/Shutterstock.com

Sleep training for your kids: Why and how it works

Adults are not the only people in the US who have problems with sleep – babies and children suffer from loss of sleep, too. Two pediatric sleep experts explain how you can help your little ones.
Research shows that physical activity and avoiding screens before bed are both strategies to protect your teenagers’ sleep. (Unsplash/Andrea Tummons)

How much sleep do teenagers really need?

When teenagers sleep for less than eight hours a night, they are at increased risk of suicide, being overweight, high rates of injury, poor sustained attention and low school grades.
Their hormones mean they still need zzz’s even when they’re already supposed to be in homeroom. Antonio Guillem/Shutterstock.com

Sleepy teenage brains need school to start later in the morning

Teenagers aren't just lazy. Their sleep hormones aren't calibrated to let them get up and go until later in the morning – which has academic and health consequences when school starts too early.
Trying to fall asleep can be a tricky, especially when we try too hard. Shutterstock

Health Check: five ways to get a better night’s sleep

We know that not getting adequate sleep means we do a disservice to our brain and our physical and metabolic health. But what are the real secrets to a good night’s rest?
The activities we do during the day – from having a fight with a partner to using our iPhones at night – also affect our hormone levels and, in turn, our quality of sleep. Jan Faukner/Shutterstock

Chemical messengers: how hormones help us sleep

Sleep allows many of our hormones to replenish so we have the optimal energy, immunity, appetite and coping ability to face the day’s highs and lows.
Light from electronic devices can alter the quality of sleep our quality. Alexander Rentsch/Flickr

Booting up or powering down: how e-readers affect your sleep

While many of these devices, especially e-readers, seem harmless enough, the light they emit may affect our sleep patterns and leave us feeling tired the next day.

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