Articles on Metadata retention

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A range of laws allow Australian agencies such as local governments to peer over security agencies’ shoulder at your personal data. Justin Lane/EPA

Think your metadata is only visible to national security agencies? Think again

Under controversial national security laws, parts of your mobile phone data is accessible by federal police and counterterrorism agencies. But in reality dozens of other organisations can access it too.
Although WhatsApp is described as en encrypted messaging service, it’s not as secure as you might think. rachit tank / unsplash

Becoming more like WhatsApp won’t solve Facebook’s woes – here’s why

Facebook seems to be shifting its focus more towards privacy. But this might have some unexpected repercussions, as highlighted by recent research on the encrypted messaging service WhatsApp.
New legislation allows Australian government agencies to access encrypted WhatsApp messages. from www.shutterstock.com

Australians accept government surveillance, for now

The government can access your phone metadata, drivers licence photo and much more. And new research shows Australians are OK about it. But that might change.
Evidence isn’t always as straightforward as it might first seem. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: Brain-zapping, the curious case of the n-rays and other stories of evidence

Brain-zapping, the curious case of the n-rays and other stories of evidence. The Conversation, CC BY70.4 MB (download)
You've had an x-ray before but have you had an n-ray? Of course not, because they're not real. But people used to think they were. Today, on Trust Me, I'm an Expert, we're bringing you stories on the theme of evidence.
Most Australians are unlikely to be able to describe the doctrine of the separation of powers, but they’re quick to assert their liberties under the rubric of a ‘fair go’. AAP/Richard Milnes

Gillian Triggs: How the ‘fair go’ became the last bulwark for Australia’s freedoms

The government’s uncontested assessment of national interest and security often trumps the rule of domestic and international law, as well as Australia’s obligations under human rights treaties.
Miriam Stannage, The White House [chainsaw], 1999, digital photograph. Copyright and courtesy of the artist.

Watching the watchmen: when artists stare back at CCTV

As governments gain greater access to private information there is a need to protect our freedoms. Artists can make a distinct contribution to this debate by offering alternative perspectives.
Mountains of data are being collected on you, and much of it is beyond your grasp. kris krüg/Flickr

Beyond metadata: the brave new world of big data retention

Metadata is only the beginning. The Big Data trend means there's a lot more information about us out there that can be tracked or monitored.
Journalists tackle the Prime minister Tony Abbott at a typical media conference at Parliament House in Canberra. AAP Image/Lukas Coch

Data retention plan amended for journalists, but is it enough?

The Abbott government's efforts to amend its data retention bill amid concerns about journalists protecting their sources is still a worry. And others should be concerned too, including MP.
Is mass data retention the way to go or should authorities be forced to come back with a warrant to find what they want? Flickr/Rosalyn Davis

What ‘safeguards’ are in Australia’s data retention plans?

As the Australian government pushes on with its data retention bill there are still questions about what safeguards and protections are in place, and a look at similar moves that have failed overseas.

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