Articles on migrant caravan

Displaying all articles

In this April 2019 photo, migrants planning to join a caravan of several hundred people hoping to reach the United States wait at the bus station in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. (AP Photo/Delmer Martinez)

The role of Canadian mining in the plight of Central American migrants

Canada is playing a role in the life-and-death struggle for migrant justice in the United States -- from our foreign economic policies to the actions of our mining companies and domestic asylum laws.
A member of Mexico’s National Guard watches for migrants on the Rio Suchiate between Guatemala and Mexico at sunrise on July 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Idalia Rie)

As Mexico appeases Trump, migrants bear the brunt

The U.S. will likely continue to threaten Mexico with trade tariffs due to Central American migrants, and Mexico will respond with more drastic, inhumane measures. None of it will stop migration.
One of 2018’s unforgettable images: Maria Meza and her twin daughters sprint from tear gas lobbed at the border wall between the U.S and Mexico in Tijuana, Nov. 25, 2018. Reuters/Kim Kyung Hoon

Remembering the caravan: 5 essential reads that show the desperation of Central American migrants

The migrant caravan was one of the biggest international stories of 2018, a roving human drama that laid bare Central America's pain for all the world to see.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem 'dumped' on America's doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.
In this Nov. 25, 2018 photo, a Honduran migrant converses with U.S border agents on the other side of razor wire after they fired tear gas at migrants pressuring to cross into the U.S. from Tijuana, Mexico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

The bogus demonization of the ‘migrant caravan’

The Donald Trump administration is repelling asylum-seekers by any means necessary, treating them as invaders and using military rhetoric to demonize them. It's time for reality to prevail.
Migrants begin their day inside a former concert venue serving as a shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico, Dec. 2, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

The challenge of parenting in a migrant caravan

The psychological health of migrant children will be deeply impacted by their flight from gang violence, and the experience of crowded unhygienic conditions and tear gas at the U.S. border.
Honduran migrant Elizabeth Umanzor hugs her six-year-old daughter Gina outside the tent where their family of five is sleeping at an sports complex sheltering more than 5,000 Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

How to develop the mental health care that refugees really need

Research shows that when refugees arrive in Canada they find a health system that is ill-equipped to meet their complex social and psychological needs.
A Honduran migrant lies on a riverbank as Mexican police move away from tear gas fired by U.S. agents at the Mexico-U.S. border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Donald Trump’s populism preys upon collective anxieties

President Donald Trump's deployment of inflammatory rhetoric about immigration is now in action. Here's why Canadians should be alarmed by populism that preys upon people's insecurities.
U.S. President Donald Trump is seen at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on Nov. 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Trump’s fascist efforts to demolish democracy

Donald Trump's relentless nods to fascism in his rhetoric requires us to form a language of resistance, rooted in compassion for others, justice and the confrontation of the forces of tyranny.
Members of the migrant caravan, mostly Hondurans, cross a river that separates Guatemala and Mexico. EPA/Esteban Biba

Origins and implications of the caravan of Honduran migrants

Honduran migrants trudging north towards the US-Mexico border are fleeing violence and poverty that has its roots in activities of 10th-century American fruit companies.
A photograph by Oliver de Ros presents a different impression of the migrants at the Guatemalan border than the standard tropes published. Migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border wait on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)

Visual tropes of migration tell predictable but misleading stories

Photographs can influence us -- they can inspire us to act and they can also impact the way we think about issues. The recent published photos about the migrant 'caravan' convey several stereotypes.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.

Top contributors

More