Articles on Mitch McConnell

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Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell, the senate majority leader, has a lot of power. AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

If impeachment comes to the Senate – 5 questions answered

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is known as a master of Senate rules. If the House impeaches President Trump, what could he do to influence the process – and outcome – of a trial?
Author Ta-Nehisi Coates, left, and actor Danny Glover, right, testify about reparation for the descendants of slaves during a hearing before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Capitol Hill on June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

What Canada and South Africa can teach the U.S. about slavery reparations

Reparation opponents who oppose truth and reconciliation by insisting that America’s “original sin” of slavery is in the distant past should heed the lessons of Canada and South Africa.
For many, the heart of the health care debate is the ability of patients to choose their own health care, including whether to buy insurance and which doctor to see. Alpa Prod/Shutterstock.com

What does choice mean when it comes to health care?

The Republican position on health care has been based upon a belief in individual choice. Here's how their own versions of health care bills eroded choice, however, and how they also did harm.
Mitch McConnell has a majority in the Senate – but his mission to push President Trump’s legislative agenda has been far from easy. Reuters/Carlos Barria

Mitch McConnell, the president’s man in the Senate

Why would McConnell push a vote to repeal Obamacare when he knows it won't pass? It's not as crazy as it sounds.
North Carolina NAACP President Rev. William Barber, accompanied by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas, left, as activists, many with the clergy, are taken into custody by U.S. Capitol Police on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 13, 2017, after protesting against the Republican health care bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why health savings accounts are a bust for the poor but a boost for the privileged

The latest Senate health care bill is still a hodgepodge of efforts to repeal Obamacare, critics say. One of their concerns is the focus on HSAs.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, shown here in June, 2017, is the architect of the new version of the Senate health care bill released today. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

The 5 faulty beliefs that have led to Republican dysfunction on health care

Republicans have had a hard time dismantling the Affordable Care Act, despite their promises. That could be because they are operating under certain beliefs about health care that are not accurate.
A woman speaks up at a town hall gathering with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) in March 2017. Mark Crammer/AP

How bills to replace Obamacare would especially harm women

Almost nine million women gained insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act. Here's why women could be set back by Republican bills to undo the ACA.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who announced June 27 that a vote on the Senate health care bill has been delayed until after the July 4 recess. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Republican health care bills defy the party’s own ideology

The health care bill proposed by Senate Republicans was little better than the House version, which begs an important question: Who's driving health care law – a free market or insurance companies?
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) smiles after he unveiled the Senate health care bill on June 22, 2017. Scott Applewhite/AP

How to make sense of the Senate health care bill: 4 essential reads

The Senate released its new health care bill on June 22, 2017, and it differs slightly from a bill passed by the House in May. Read what our experts have written in recent months about key pieces.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders at the Capitol on June 6, 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP

How Obamacare may morph into Medicaid

Senate Republicans have been trying to find a way to get enough votes to repeal Obamacare. Here's how their delay could lead to a result they did not expect – more Medicaid.

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