Articles on Mosquito borne diseases

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Most cases of Zika are asymptomatic. Airman Magazine/U.S. Air Force Photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro/Flickr

Zika virus: Only a few small outbreaks likely to occur in the continental US

A computer model suggests that while more cases of Zika can be expected in the continental U.S. outbreaks will probably be small and are not projected to spread.
A common mosquito in coastal regions of Australia, Aedes vigilax. Could it be spreading the pathogen that causes Buruli ulcer? Mr Stephen Doggett (NSW Health Pathology)

Are mosquitoes to blame for the spread of ‘flesh-eating’ bacteria?

A rise in cases of the mysterious "Bairnsdale ulcer" in coastal Victoria has health authorities on alert and scientists investigating the role of mosquitoes in the spread.
Aedes aegypti mosquitoes at the Laboratory of Entomology and Ecology of the Dengue Branch of the CDC in San Juan. Alvin Baez/Reuters

Understanding mosquitoes can help us find better ways to kill them

While no one likes getting bitten by mosquitoes, you might be surprised (and even a little fascinated) at the complex adaptions mosquitoes have developed to locate their favorite food sources.
A book about Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is seen next to larvae in a laboratory conducting research on preventing the spread of the Zika virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, at the Ministry of Public Health in Guatemala City. Josue Decavele/Reuters

Zika: Aedes aegypti mosquitoes love biting humans, and that’s why they spread viruses so well

Aedes aegypti is adapted to live in close proximity with humans, and this close association likely contributes to the severity of the Zika outbreak.
Municipal workers wait before spraying insecticide to prevent the spread of Aedes aegypti mosquito at Sambodrome in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, January 26, 2016. Pilar Olivares/Reuters

Explainer: where did Zika virus come from and why is it a problem in Brazil?

Zika was discovered almost 70 years ago, but wasn't associated with outbreaks until 2007. So how did this formerly obscure virus wind up causing so much trouble in Brazil?
The yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti isn’t put off by this ‘mosquito repellent’ wrist band. Cameorn Webb

Health Check: do wrist bands work to repel mozzies?

While slipping on a wrist band or sticking on a patch may be an attractive alternative, they’re unlikely to provide any substantial protection from biting mosquitoes.
Detecting viruses in wild-caught mosquitoes provides intimate detail of disease transmission cycles. University of Washington SPH/Flickr

How a new test is revolutionising what we know about viruses in our midst

We monitor mosquitoes to help predict and control virus outbreaks. And a new technique for collecting mosquito saliva from the field has made the process both more sensitive and inexpensive.

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