Music

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To the uninitiated, extreme metal can be an impenetrable wall of guitar-based noise. Florian Stangl. Picture of Morbid Angel.

The case for extreme metal

For many people, their knowledge of extreme metal mainly springs from the nefarious activities of a small group of Norwegian musicians in the 1990s. But there's more to this genre than meets the eye.
American rapper Tyler the Creator cancelled his Australian tour following a campaign by feminist grassroots activist group Collective Shout. Pemberton Music Festival/ Mark C Austin

Art, activism and our creative future

Arts activism isn't new, but online activist movements are changing the way it gets done. In this anonymous virtual landscape, does activism democratise social relations, or nurture inequality?
Fans cheer on the heavy metal band Motörhead. brandi/flickr

The fate of the metalheads

Parents and politicians once feared heavy metal music would inspire devil worship, reckless sex and rampant drug use. A new study investigates what became of young metal fans.
After travelling through the bush, returning to the cacophonies of the sonic city can be exhilarating. drp

We need a new relationship with urban noise

After travelling through the bush, returning to the cacophonies of the sonic city can be exhilarating. The body is immediately swamped with an energy that speaks of action, progress, and possibility.
A drummer performs at the Beijing International Jazz Festival. Reuters

Can jazz thrive in China?

With Blue Note Jazz Club opening a venue in Beijing, a genre that's flagging stateside may experience a Far East revival.
In a track called Bring it Back Home, Hugh Masekela bemoans the tendency by politicians, who after ascending to power, discard the people who helped them get there. Andrea De Silva/Reuters

South African musicians in the eye of party political storm

Concert organisers began to compete for government contracts. Often these contracts came with conditions as to who, among musicians, was desirable at government events.
Men at Work were found liable for copying two bars from Kookaburra Sits on the Old Gum Tree – a ‘fair use’ exception would have prevented this. Jolene Bertoldi

The Down Under book and film remind us our copyright law’s still unfair for artists

A new book and documentary tell us more about the story behind Men at Work's song Down Under – and the court case it eventually led to. They also prompt questions about current Australian copyright law.
Music – as a tool of mobilising people against power – tends to suit a more progressive agenda. AAP/Richard Milnes

Barnes vs Reclaim Australia: does Khe Sanh work as a conservative protest song?

Cold Chisel’s Khe Sanh was played at Reclaim Australia rallies in various cities last weekend – but won't be again, after a public statement by the band's frontman, Jimmy Barnes. Was it a good song choice?

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