Articles on Natural disasters

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The sun rises behind the remains of a New Jersey roller coaster destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. AP Photo/Mel Evans

New data set explores 90 years of natural disasters in the US

As the rich move away from disaster-prone areas, the poor may be left behind.
All tropical cyclones in the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, with their locations shown at six-hour intervals and color representing maximum wind speed. Cyclonebiskit/Wikipedia

Getting ready for hurricanes: 6 essential reads

Major hurricanes threaten millions of people and billions of dollars in property along the Atlantic coast. Here experts advise on preparing, understanding forecasts and recovering after a storm.
Tornado seven miles south of Anadarko, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999. OAR/ERL/National Severe Storms Laboratory/Flickr

Understanding tornadoes: 5 questions answered

As deadly tornadoes rip through southern and central states, two meteorology professors explain what causes these dangerous storms.
UN member states are holding consultations as part of the development of a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Global compact on migration should focus on harnessing its win-win benefits

In a changing and unsettled world, migration can be a greater-than-ever contributor to development for communities of origin, destination areas, and for the migrants themselves.
Poorly resourced small towns like Marysville often struggle to recover from disasters like the Black Saturday bushfires. Andrew Brownbill/AAP

We can learn a lot from disasters, and we now know some areas don’t recover

Rebuilding small communities on the same site in the same way seldom works. It’s not about getting back to where you were, but rather grasping the opportunity to create a more resilient place.
Devastation in Sichuan province after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, thought to be induced by industrial activity at a nearby reservoir. dominiqueb/flickr

Earthquakes triggered by humans pose growing risk

A new project tracks earthquakes accidentally induced by human activity. It suggests the problem is bigger than some scientists thought.

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