Articles on Neurodevelopmental disorders

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Rylie, age 10, is one of the nearly 1000 children diagnosed with Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome, a rare form of autism. Photo curtesy of Pitt Hopkins Research Foundation. Photo credit: Christa Michelle Photography

A drug for autism? Potential treatment for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome offers clues

The complexity of autism makes research difficult, but understanding even rare forms of autism is leading to greater insight into the biology of these disorders and potential new treatments.
If youths with brain impairment had been identified and supported early, their entry into the justice system could have been avoided entirely. from shutterstock.com

Almost every young person in WA detention has a severe brain impairment

New research assessing young people in WA detention found 89% were severely impaired in at least one area of brain function. One in three had fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).
For many parents, sorting the “normal” quirkiness of childhood behaviour from the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be anxiety provoking. (Shutterstock)

Does my child have autism or is this ‘normal’ behaviour?

Early intervention is key to treating autism, but how is a family to know which quirky childhood behaviours might be symptoms? An educational psychologist explains.
Dyspraxia is a neurodevelopmental disorder, meaning it affects brain function and unfolds as the person grows. somsak nitimongkolchai/Shutterstock

Explainer: what is dyspraxia and how is it different to clumsiness?

Most of us learn to tie our shoelaces, dress ourselves and eat with cutlery with relative ease. But for children with dyspraxia, these tasks are incredibly difficult to master.
Future tennis champion? ‘He walked at eight months, ran at ten months and could catch a ball by the age of one.’ leungchopan

Are children who walk and talk early geniuses in the making?

Milestone charts can be an effective tool in spotting developmental problems. But do they say anything about the future potential of children who are developing normally?
Mothers with genetic mutations not harmful to females may be passing them onto their sons. Vincent van der Pas/Flickr (resized)

Mothers’ genes may be why autism is more common in boys

Boys are more likely to be diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism, because girls need more extreme genetic…

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