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Some argue that morality is everywhere, or maybe nowhere, in our brain. Martin Deutsch/Flickr

Is there a moral centre in our brain?

There's no single region in the brain responsible for all moral decision making. But neuroscience research has shown specific brain regions are involved when we're faced with moral dilemmas.
Mysteries of the mind. Brain via

Oliver Sacks, the brain and God

Oliver Sacks, the celebrated neurologic storyteller who died at the end of August at age 82, once described himself as “strongly atheist by disposition.” Sacks could write sensitively about religion, including…
Even in a dreary office, by understanding how your brain works you can change how it feels to be there. from

Health Check: Stressed at work? How to beat common traps in the rat race

In many of the workplaces I visit as a neuroscientist, stressed workers behave much like addicted lab rats. But you don't have to quit the rat race to start feeling better at work.
Dire predictions on the future of children’s brains are shocking, not least because of how flimsy the evidence is to support these views.

Don’t panic, the internet won’t rot children’s brains

Baseless claims about the damage done to kids' development create needless panic. And they distract from legitimate, evidence-based concerns with which parents need to engage.
Nobody’s perfect – not you, and not your kids. And that’s OK. from

Five things every guilty parent needs to know

Feeling guilty and out of your depth as a parent? You're not alone – and there are ways to turn the guilt you're feeling into positive changes for your family.
The difference between “real” time, measured by clocks, and our own sense of time can sometimes seem enormous. Seán Ó Domhnaill/Flickr

How did it get so late so soon? Why time flies as we get older

While few will dispute that a minute comprises 60 seconds, the perception of time can vary dramatically from person to person and from one situation to the next. Time can race, or it can drag.
Mystic rodent. Starsandspirals

Do rats dream of the future?

'Place cells' in the hippocampus are thought to guide us through our space but they may play a part in helping us to imagine future scenarios.

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