Neuroscience

articles 1 to 20 of 195

Dire predictions on the future of children’s brains are shocking, not least because of how flimsy the evidence is to support these views. zeitfaenger.at/Flickr

Don’t panic, the internet won’t rot children’s brains

Baseless claims about the damage done to kids' development create needless panic. And they distract from legitimate, evidence-based concerns with which parents need to engage.
Nobody’s perfect – not you, and not your kids. And that’s OK. from www.shutterstock.com

Five things every guilty parent needs to know

Feeling guilty and out of your depth as a parent? You're not alone – and there are ways to turn the guilt you're feeling into positive changes for your family.
The difference between “real” time, measured by clocks, and our own sense of time can sometimes seem enormous. Seán Ó Domhnaill/Flickr

How did it get so late so soon? Why time flies as we get older

While few will dispute that a minute comprises 60 seconds, the perception of time can vary dramatically from person to person and from one situation to the next. Time can race, or it can drag.
Mystic rodent. Starsandspirals

Do rats dream of the future?

'Place cells' in the hippocampus are thought to guide us through our space but they may play a part in helping us to imagine future scenarios.
Drug-based therapies for anxiety disorders work on roughly half of those affected and treated. shutterstock

Seven new genes linked to anxiety disorders

There is hope that new drugs can be created to treat anxiety disorders after seven new genes were linked to these diseases.
The answer is a resounding no – brains are more sophisticated than that. Dmitry Kirsanov/Flickr

Health Check: can your brain be ‘full’?

The brain is truly a marvel. A seemingly endless library, whose shelves house our most precious memories as well as our lifetime's knowledge. But is there a point where it reaches capacity?
You can do a lot while you sleep. Woman via www.shutterstock.com.

Can we unlearn social biases while we sleep?

We strengthen memories while we sleep, and researchers have found a way to cue that process to help people better retain information that counters implicit biases.

Top contributors

More