Articles on News Corp

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In recent years, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp papers have become more politically aggressive, adopting the openly partisan approach of British tabloids. Jason Reed/AAP

The secret history of News Corp: a media empire built on spreading propaganda

New research reveals how News Limited was secretly established in the early 1900s by a mining company for the express purpose of disseminating 'propaganda'.
In handing Geoffrey Rush a victory in his defamation case against The Daily Telegraph, the judge said the actor’s reputation was harmed by a “recklessly irresponsible piece of sensational journalism.” Dylan Coker/AAP

Geoffrey Rush’s victory in his defamation case could have a chilling effect on the #MeToo movement

The judgement is a personal and legal vindication for the actor, but it may have unintended side effects for the #MeToo movement and the reporting of sexual harassment allegations.
The difference in the Christchurch attacks is that propaganda supplied by the perpetrator was available to the professional media, even as the story was breaking. Wes Mountain/The Conversation

Christchurch attacks provide a new ethics lesson for professional media

On the day of the Christchurch mosque shootings, several media outlets repeatedly failed the test of necessity in showing graphic footage.
Public interest reporting is often equated with watchdog or investigative reporting. But it can include other factual stories that serve the public interest. Shutterstock

Explainer: what is public interest journalism?

Public interest journalism exposes corruption and wrongdoers, and holds the powerful to account. But it is increasingly under threat, and we need to find ways to protect it.
Mitch Fifield recently announced the Turnbull government would once again attempt to tackle media reform. AAP/Mick Tsikas

Why media reform in Australia has been so hard to achieve

The Australian media policy omelette cannot simply be unscrambled. But forward-thinking diversity rules could help prevent further concentration of media ownership.
With every round of redundancies, significant questions arise around the long-term viability of mainstream news media in Australia. AAP/David Moir

Life after redundancy: what happens next for journalists when they leave newsrooms

There is lingering anger among journalists made redundant that expertise and experience seem to have become disposable assets in newsrooms.
Is Rupert Murdoch’s influence on the Australian political landscape what it used to be? AAP/Paul Miller

Cheerleaders of the press don’t win elections like they used to

Given newspapers' continued role as the main provider of new news every day, and the amplifying effect of social media, their potential to influence the body politic remains substantial.

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