Articles on Painting

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Detail of Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori, Dibirdibi Country – Topway 2016. Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art Collection Image courtesy Alcaston Gallery © The Estate of the Artist and Viscopy Australia

Here’s looking at: Dibirdibi Country – Topway by Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori

Mirdidingkingathi Juwarnda Sally Gabori began painting in her 80s, and over ten years created an extraordinary body of work. Her paintings are more like music and dance – depicting the stories of the Kaiadilt people for the first time.
Detail of Frida Kahlo, Self-portrait with monkeys 1943. The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection of Mexican Art © 2016 Banco de Mexico Diego Rivera Frida Kahlo Museums Trust, Mexico DF

Here’s looking at Frida Kahlo’s Self-portrait with monkeys

The Mexican artist Frida Kahlo kept monkeys as pets and painted them often. They symbolised the children she couldn't have and were worshipped as gods of fertility in Aztec times.
Big Blue Lavender Bay, one of the three paintings at the centre of trial. AAP Image/Genevieve Gannon

Is your artwork genuine and who can you trust to advise you?

The conviction of two men in relation to the sale of forged Brett Whiteley paintings indicates that Australia needs to get its act together when it comes to authenticating artworks.
Why is Whistler’s mother one of the most persistently famous images in the world? James McNeill Whistler, Arrangement in grey and black no. 1 (Portrait of the artist's mother) 1871. Image courtesy of the NGV.

Here’s looking at: ‘Whistler’s Mother’

Whistler's Mother, which arrives in Melbourne on March 25, is one of the most famous portraits in the world. But James Whistler never wanted the sitter's identity known.
Long Island gallerist Glafira Rosales (left) sold fake paintings to Knoedler director Ann Freedman (right), who then turned them around for millions. Was Freedman aware that they were fakes?

The rise and fall of the Knoedler, New York’s most notorious art gallery

What, exactly, was going on at the Knoedler Gallery in the years leading up to a forgery indictment?
Guy Grey-Smith’s Rottnest connects strongly to the land. Detail from Guy Grey-Smith, Rottnest, 1954-57, oil on canvas, 61.2x76.5 cm (h,w), The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Tom Collins Bequest Fund, 1957, © The University of Western Australia

Here’s looking at: Rottnest by Guy Grey-Smith

Guy Grey-Smith's painting showcases the insistent rhythms of the indigenous vegetation and the rolling, flowing movements that take our eye meandering across the landscape and back towards the horizon.
Han van Meegeren’s Vermeer forgery, Christ and the Adulteress. Amazon

The secret to all great art forgeries

The best forgers don't simply create convincing fakes; they go after the preconceived beliefs of the very people who judge a painting's value and authenticity.
Tom Roberts is an iconic Australian artist. Who does that icon represent? Opening of the first parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia, 9 May 1901, Tom Roberts, 1903. Courtesy of the NGA.

Tom Roberts anyone? A national survey finds the line in art appreciation

Is the National Gallery of Australia's exhibition of Tom Roberts' really 'for all Australians'? A recent national survey finds a racial divide in Australian art appreciation.
Rembrandt’s famous painting – commonly known as The Night Watch – doesn’t even take place at night. 'Rembrandt' via www.shutterstock.com

How the painting got its name

The history of the picture title is really a history of the last 300 years.
A painting from Botha’s Shelter in the Ndedema Gorge in the Drakensburg, said to be home to a rich tapestry of San art and life. Wits University Press

An enigmatic theme in San rock paintings is finally unlocked

Formlings are representations of flying termites and their underground nests. They are associated with botantical subjects considered by the San to have great spiritual significance.
Khayamiya or Egyptian Tentmaker Applique provides a memorable introduction to Islamic art. Photo by Timothy Crutchett Charles Sturt University

The invisibility of Islamic art in Australia

Islamic art in Australia is inaccessible and largely overlooked. It is rarely taught as a dedicated subject in Australian universities, and almost never seen beyond state capitals. Why?

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