Articles on Political advertising

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Clive Palmer didn’t win any seats for his party in the election, but he says his massive advertising spend was “worth it” to prevent Bill Shorten from becoming prime minister. Darren England/AAP

After Clive Palmer’s $60 million campaign, limits on political advertising are more important than ever

Australia needs to rein in the ever-increasing role of private money in federal elections with caps on political advertising and donations.
Political advertising has moved away from traditional media and is now more prevalent on platforms like Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram. AAP/ALP/Liberal Party/GetUp!/Australian Youth Climate Coalition

Facebook videos, targeted texts and Clive Palmer memes: how digital advertising is shaping this election campaign

The major parties are focusing on social media like never before to get their messaging out – and finding more creative ways to do it.
The American people used to get more information in common. sirtravelalot/Shutterstock.com

Solving the political ad problem with transparency

Micro-targeted online advertising has destroyed how Americans share experiences and a common knowledge base. The fix for this societal and political problem is as simple now as it was in 1840.
Malcolm Turnbull’s short biographical video on social media talks about being raised by his single-parent father, and the love his father Bruce showered on his son. AAP/Lukas Coch

Honour thy parents, lead thy nation: Turnbull and Shorten play to the family feeling

Malcolm Turnbull's video and Bill Shorten's book are underpinned by the same idea: the love their parents had for them, and that in turn imbued them with the right qualities to become prime minister.
Opposing a candidate is more confidence-building, and action-driving, than supporting one. Elvert Barnes/Flickr

Voters who oppose politicians are the most active

Opposition inspires more confidence in one's position than support and also helps to turn judgments into actions. This helps explain why attack ads are a crucial tool in politicians' arsenals.
Dr Karl shouldn’t be afraid of getting political - as long as he’s doing it for science, not politicians. AAP Image/Mick Tsikas

Dr Karl didn’t breach ethics, but now he should spruik the science

Dr Karl has been criticised for fronting adverts for a government report he turned out not to agree with. But despite his lapse in judgement, he hasn't seriously breached his journalistic ethics.
Would there be a place in advertising’s postmodern era for Don Draper? Michael Yarish/AMC

After Mad Men, big money replaced big ideas

The final season concludes in 1969. What happened in the advertising industry over the ensuing decades?
Vote Ed, get an interesting new fashion accessory. Conservative Party

Tories hope attack ads will put the election in their pocket

The news today that Ed Milband has ruled out forming a coalition with the SNP may come too late to limit the impact of the latest Tory attempt to illustrate that the Labour leader is a political lightweight…
The government’s ad spruiking proposed changes to higher education. Is it legal? And if so, should it be? Youtube screen grab

The difference between government advertising and political advertising

The federal government’s recent television advertisement spruiking the benefits of the proposed changes to higher education have raised the ire of not only the opposition but also taxpayers who have reportedly…

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