Articles on Psychology

Displaying 701 - 720 of 907 articles

Subjecting job seekers to bogus personality tests, as the UK did, was a misuse of behavioural insights. Lucky Business/Shutterstock

The promise and perils of giving the public a policy ‘nudge’

Do you consider yourself a rational person? For the most part, you probably are. If something hurts, you’ll stop doing it. If you like something, you’ll buy more of it, but you’ll rethink your decision…
Thank goodness for black and white. Michael

Explainer: why do we blush?

Awkward and embarrassing, the human act of blushing raises many difficult psychological and physiological questions. Why should an emotional response take this particular form and does it serve any purpose…
New research shows how a climate of uncertainty pushes us towards worse outcomes. Lukiyanova Natalia/frenta/Shutterstock

Uncertainty isn’t cause for climate complacency – quite the opposite

If we’re not certain that the problem’s there, then … we shouldn’t take actions which have a high severity the other way. This was the response from David Murray – then chairman of Australia’s Future Fund…
Milgram concluded that most of us can be induced to torture someone else at the behest of an authority figure – but that’s only part of the story. afromztoa/Flickr

Revisiting Milgram’s shocking obedience experiments

Chances are you’ve heard of Stanley Milgram’s obedience experiments. In 1961, Milgram recruited pairs of volunteers to take part in a “memory test”. One volunteer was given the job of teacher, the other…
Climbing the social ladder can be slippery in parts for teenagers. Sadie Hernandez/Flickr

Popular school students get bullied too

The stereotype that popular kids don’t get bullied has been busted by a new study that found becoming more popular at school…
In the face of pressures that turn us against each other, it pays to be aware of the potential costs of reducing sympathy. mrhayata/Flickr

Bad Samaritans: why people don’t step in to stop violence

Every now and then, and rarely far apart in time, the media features a story about an assault in public where bystanders failed to come to the victim’s aid. Of course, there are many possible reasons why…
‘I’m walkin’ on sunshine, whoooa oh! And don’t it feel good!‘ Daniele Zedda/Flickr (cropped)

Chills and thrills: why some people love music – and others don’t

Think of your favourite piece of music. Do you get shivers when the music swells or the chorus kicks in? Or are the opening few bars enough to make you feel tingly? Despite having no obvious survival value…
Kali187

Why is music so popular?

Research published today in the journal Cell Biology describes a new condition, musical anhedonia – the inability to experience pleasure from music. Specifically the researchers were able to identify a…
Friend or foe: what do you see? Kquedquest

Trauma makes us shun kindness when we need it most

It seems intuitive that many of us would fear and avoid emotions such as anger and anxiety. But some people fear positive emotions such as happiness and contentment, and of accepting the compassion, kindness…
The bird that just won’t die. But can you live without it?

Flappy Bird obsession is not necessarily an addiction

Flappy Bird, a deceptively simple gaming app, has been withdrawn by its creator Dong Nguyen because it is too “addictive”. His decision appears to have sparked a frenzy among fans who are reportedly so…
Some psychological theories can help us understand why some people stick with rough relationships and try to ride out the storm. Sean Davis

All you need is love: the psychology of romance

Thousands of couples will celebrate a day of romance this week, while many single people will hope for their own one. But what makes a relationship last? And what makes one couple crumble while another…
Sorry, but ‘sensing’ change isn’t unique – everyone can do it. Flickr/Machine Project

Know this: the ‘sixth sense’ is all in your head

Many of us have had this experience: you’re sure that something has changed, but unable to say what it is. Perhaps a colleague has new glasses, or has grown a beard. For all of your trying to identify…
They’ve got their own issues. Chicago Man

Getting older doesn’t make you more conservative

Seventy years ago Swedish sociologist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Alva Myrdal pointed out in Nation and Family the generational bias inherent in democratic political systems: young voters will be old…
Resolved to be ‘more active’? Try instead to set yourself a specific goal that you can achieve with small steps. Flickr/Ed Yourdon

Struggling with that New Year’s resolution? How to hang in there

It’s a time of year when many of us have made resolutions. The New Year feels like an ideal time to kick those old habits and replace them with habits that we hope will make us thinner/richer/younger-looking/insert-desirable-state-of-your-own-here…
We think checkouts influence obesity but does it? Jurijus Azanovas

Hard Evidence: do supermarket checkouts make kids obese?

Your eye gets caught by the dried apples slices and pistachios but your child, sitting in the trolley, sees the Percy pig sweets. The queue is moving slowly, how well do you resist? A commentary by Deborah…
It’s no surprise the TV coverage makes you want a drink. Elise Amendola/AP

Media more stressful for some than witnessing Boston bombs

Those who experience a terrorist attack firsthand are prone to suffer from acute stress. That much is obvious. But does living…

Top contributors

More