Articles on Quantum computing

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Preparing conducting carbon nanospheres that operate as qubits at room temperature (right) by burning naphthalene (left). Dr Mohammad Choucair

All you need for quantum computing at room temperature is some mothballs

Much of the current research in quantum computing involves work at close to absolute zero. A simple breakthough with an everyday material could see them work at more acceptable temperatures.
Malcolm Turnbull has now announced his strategy to promote innovation and science in Australia. AAP/Lukas Coch

Expert panel: what the national innovation statement means for science

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull today announced the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA). Here's what it means for science, commercialisation and industry in Australia.
Binary systems are not enough if you want to improve security. Flickr/Ivan Plata

Beating cyber criminals with quantum solutions

As hackers get more sophisticated in their cyber crime efforts we need to look to new technology to make our systems more secure, and potentially unhackable. So how can quantum physics help?
An ion trap of the type used in the experiment. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Innsbruck

Quantum computer makes finding new physics more difficult

Physicists often work unusual hours. You will find them running experiments at 4am and 10pm. This is because, so long as the pertinent conditions inside a lab – such as temperature or light level – are…
Let’s take a look back through the past 12 months of quantum physics research. sharyn morrow/Flickr

Computing, uncertainty … quantum leaps and bounds of 2014

The past year has provided some of the most interesting developments in quantum mechanics to date. The field is more than 100 years old and has been tested to unimaginable precision, yet some of its most…
Artist’s impression of an electron wave function (blue), confined in a crystal of nuclear-spin-free 28-silicon atoms (black). The spin of the electron encodes a long-lived, high fidelity quantum bit. Dr Stephanie Simmons, UNSW Australia

Quantum computing poised for new silicon revolution

A dramatic increase in the amount of time data can be stored on a single atom means silicon could once again play a vital role in the development of super-fast computers. The silicon chip revolutionised…
As hard to understand as the movie The Matrix. jurvetson

Quantum tech disappoints, but only because we don’t get it

Over the next five years, the UK government will spend £270m on supporting research in “quantum technology”. When budget announcements were made in 2013, provisions for offshore wind and shale gas extraction…
Revelations of a quantum world. ox4photos

X-ray vision for road diggers: the next quantum leap?

Quantum mechanics has been hailed as the next big thing in technology. And quantum computers are a media favourite. But there is a little-known quantum technology that can peer beneath the earth, which…
Quantum computers are no longer a science fiction dream, thanks to the work of researchers such as Andrea Morello. UNSW/Peter Morris

Qubits and pieces: in pursuit of quantum computing

The Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science recognise excellence in science and science teaching. This year, we asked three prizewinners to reflect on their work and factors that influenced their careers…

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