Articles on Religious freedom

Displaying 1 - 20 of 55 articles

The free trade agreement with Indonesia, which Australia originally. hoped would be signed this week when Morrison was in Singapore for the start of the summit season, has become hostage to the embassy decision. Mick Tskias/AAP

Grattan on Friday: Morrison government brings back memories of McMahon days

The fundamental point is that those were desperate days for the Coalition and so are these. "McMahon was in survival mode," says author Patrick Mullins. The same could be said of Morrison.
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced he will amend laws that allow schools to expel gay students. Joel Carrett/AAP

There’s no argument or support for allowing schools to discriminate against LGBTIQ teachers

Public opinion polls and a survey of Australian youth show there's little support for allowing schools to hire or fire teachers based on their sexual orientation.
Campaigning in Wentworth, Liberal candidate Dave Sharma, appearing at a candidates’ forum, denounced discrimination against teachers, and said the 2013 law should be changed. Dean Lewins/AAP

View from The Hill: Conservatives may come to regret stirring hornets’ nest of religious freedom

Some Liberals who agitated for action on religious freedom might be starting to appreciate that the best stand for a conservative can sometimes be to just leave things alone.
Announcements are pouring out in what is already a faux election campaign, with the government at the weekend unveiling nearly $52 million to Headspace for youth mental health. David Mariuz/AAP

Coalition trails 47-53% in Newspoll, as Ipsos finds 74% oppose law discriminating against gay students and teachers

The latest national polls come just days out from Saturday's Wentworth byelection, which will determine whether the Coalition is forced into minority government.
The Ruddock report recommends the existing right of religious schools to turn away LGBT+ students and teachers be maintained, but that further constraints be added. Shutterstock

Ruddock report constrains, not expands, federal religious exemptions

The report affirms that religious freedom is not to be legally entrenched as superior to rights to equality and freedom from discrimination.
Demonstrators take part in a protest against Quebec’s proposed Values Charter in Montreal in September 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

New premier, same old story: Québec’s longtime anti-niqab efforts

If Quebec's new premier succeeds in passing 'secularization' legislation by wielding the notwithstanding clause, it will come at the cost of civil rights and the protective capacity of the Charter.
Morrison’s brush strokes on his own portrait are designed to create the image of a leader tuned to the voters’ concerns, rather than the “Canberra bubble”. Lukas Coch/AAP

Grattan on Friday: Morrison aims to make agility his prime ministerial trademark

Morrison is tactically quicker than Turnbull, just as in his messaging he can cut through more sharply. He's more attuned to the emotional and knee-jerk drivers of today's politics.
President Donald Trump with pastor Paula White during a dinner for evangelical leaders in the White House, on Aug. 27, 2018. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

This 19th-century argument over federal support for Christianity still resonates

President Trump has promised to protect religious liberty. But there was a time when evangelicals believed that a religion that needed protection from government had no reason to exist at all.
We must protect people from harmful speech. But the cause of freedom must exceed the creation of religious exemptions. Shutterstock

Australia needs a better conversation about religious freedom

As the Ruddock review of religious freedom is about to report, we need a more sophisticated understanding of what religion is and the ways its expression can be curtailed - or can curtail others.
The justices have previously ruled that the government cannot compel people to speak its message or associate with ideas they do not hold. www.shutterstock.com

Supreme Court to rule on your First Amendment right to silence

Most people know that the First Amendment protects free speech. But two upcoming Supreme Court cases reveal how it also gives people in the US the right not to speak.

Top contributors

More