Articles on Science

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It’s a good idea to wash your hands after you go to the toilet, after you blow your nose, before you help prepare food and before you eat. Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Curious Kids: why do we need soap?

While we move soap around, it lifts up invisible oil that holds germs onto your hand.
Women scientists are under-represented in science awards with large monetary value, but over-represented in service awards. Shutterstock

Minding the gender gap in science prizes

Women scientists are under-represented in science awards with large monetary value, but over-represented in service awards.
Mountains keep growing and growing and growing for many millions of years until they are so heavy that they can no longer grow taller, only wider. Photo by Jeff Finley on Unsplash

Curious Kids: how do mountains form?

When I was little, geologists worked out Earth's surface was made of pieces, like a giant puzzle. Those pieces, called “tectonic plates”, move and bump into each other and mountains form.
Colour blind people are really good at spotting things that are far away, and they are better than most people at telling things apart by their shape. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: why are people colour blind?

Some colour blind people only have two kinds of cone cell in their eye. Others have three kinds, but the cones do not pick up the same light waves as the cone cells in most people's eyes do.
A new statistical test lets scientists figure out if two groups are similar to one another. paleontologist natural/shutterstock.com

The equivalence test: A new way for scientists to tackle so-called negative results

A new statistical test lets researchers search for similarities between groups. Could this help keep new important findings out of the file drawer?
Aerial shot shot of the rectangular iceberg found off the Larsen 3 ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck/AAP

How a near-perfect rectangular iceberg formed

Geometric icebergs can form around Antarctica, although such a perfect rectangle is unusual.
Wansink’s research showed plate size matters when it comes to how much we eat. rawpixel/Unsplash

Retraction of a journal article doesn’t make its findings false

The journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) recently retracted several papers by a leading researcher on food and consumption. What does this mean for the researcher's findings?

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