Articles on Solutions Journalism

Displaying 1 - 20 of 50 articles

Somalian refugee Mohamoud Saed stands in his friend’s clothing shop he helps out with in Clarkston, Georgia. AP Photo/David Goldman

With better data, we can help set refugees up for success

Instead of focusing only on crime, the government can help set refugees up for success by collecting data on what's working and what's not in the integration process.
Jimmy John’s tried to stop its workers from toiling for other sandwich makers. AP Photo/David Goldman

How noncompete clauses clash with US labor laws

Nearly one in five employed Americans is bound by a contract restricting moves to rival companies. Here's one way to make those arrangements less common.
Race-neutral affirmative action can help identify first-generation students like Blanca Diaz and LaQuintah Garrett. AP Photo/Amy Anthony

Colleges need affirmative action – but it can be expanded

Race-conscious admissions policies are still the best way to achieve diversity on campus. Yet, some race-neutral methods could help colleges improve diversity – and stand up to legal scrutiny.
When school gets tough, do you think it’s worthwhile? Or time to give up? Pavlin Plamenov Petkov/Shutterstock.com

Do challenges make school seem impossible or worthwhile?

A high school science test, a Psych 101 course, long job applications: Sometimes it's hard to be motivated to succeed. As it turns out, how you respond to difficulty and ease can make all the difference.
People have always asked for alms, including the men depicted in this 17th-century European etching. Wenceslaus Hollar/The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Give and take: Credentials could aid panhandling

The courts are saying that down-and-out Americans have a right to seek curbside alms despite efforts to ban the practice. Two scholars have come up with an alternative to anti-panhandling ordinances.
Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck, left, and Mayor Eric Garcetti pose next to an all-electric car in this 2015 photo. AP Photo/Nick Ut

Cities can jump-start climate progress by plugging in their vehicles

More than 200 mayors have committed their cities to stick with the Paris climate deal no matter what the US does. Electric vehicles offer a promising route to making good on that pledge.
A shot of fake news now and your defenses are raised in the future? funnyangel/Shutterstock.com.

Inoculation theory: Using misinformation to fight misinformation

Does science have an answer to science denial? Just as being vaccinated protects you from a later full-blown infection, a bit of misinformation explained could help ward off other cases down the road.
The Pinocchio anole lizard (Anolis probiscis) was first described in Ecuador in 1953, then believed to have become extinct until it was rediscovered in 2005. Javier Abalos Alvarez/Flickr

Will optimistic stories get people to care about nature?

'Doom and gloom' messages about nature are less effective than positive ones. The Lost & Found project tells the stories of creatures thought long gone but eventually rediscovered.
No need for a bank: Just a smartphone and a blockchain. Houman Haddad/UN World Food Program

Can blockchain technology help poor people around the world?

Already becoming a darling of Wall Street, blockchain technology's biggest real benefits could come to the world's poorest people. Here's how.
Planting a diverse blend of crops and cover crops, and not tilling, helps promote soil health. Catherine Ulitsky, USDA/Flickr

Healthy soil is the real key to feeding the world

Conventional wisdom says we need industrial agriculture to feed the world. Not so, says geologist David Montgomery: Practices that focus on creating healthy soil can transform agriculture.

Top contributors

More