Articles on The New Superpower

Displaying all articles

According to the ABC, newly elected MP Gladys Liu is tied to an organisation that’s part of the Chinese Communist Party’s United Front, which exerts influence among the Chinese diaspora. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Inside China’s vast influence network – how it works, and the extent of its reach in Australia

United Front's mission is to unite those who can help the Communist Party achieve its goals and neutralise its critics. This includes many influential members of the Chinese diaspora.
As younger Chinese become increasingly addicted to their mobile devices, the government’s propaganda offices have had to rethink their strategies. Roman Pilipey/EPA

Chinese propaganda goes tech-savvy to reach a new generation

To stay relevant, the Chinese Communist Party is rethinking its approach to propaganda. The reviews are decidedly mixed, but overall, younger Chinese seem drawn to the messaging.
Uyghurs in Australia are pressing Canberra to take a firmer stance with China on its treatment of the Muslim minority. Thus far, Australia’s response has been relatively muted. Tracey Nearmy/AAP

Despite China’s denials, its treatment of the Uyghurs should be called what it is: cultural genocide

China says it is helping the Uyghurs, but its actions meet the threshold of cultural genocide: 'a premeditated, calculated, systematic, malicious crime authorised by the state’s political leaders'.
When protesters took to the streets in Hong Kong, China’s state media had several tactics for how to describe it: some outlets ignored it, while others railed against ‘extremists’. Jerome Favre/AAP

Extremist mobs? How China’s propaganda machine tried to control the message in the Hong Kong protests

Pro-Beijing media used different messages to target specific audiences inside and outside China during the Hong Kong protests, but each had the same goal – putting the right spin on the news.

Top contributors

More