Articles on US Constitution

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Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, left, and Foreign Service officer George Kent are sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during the first public impeachment hearing. AP/Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Photo

Impeachment: Two quotes that defined the first day of public hearings

The first day of public impeachment testimony was defined, in part, by strongly worded statements from Representatives Adam Schiff and Devin Nunes.
The Capitol on the morning after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the House of Representatives will vote on a resolution to affirm the impeachment investigation. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Impeachment resolution: 3 reasons the House voted even though the Constitution doesn’t require it

The House of Representatives voted Thursday on a resolution that laid out a process for the inquiry into the impeachment of President Donald Trump. But was the resolution constitutionally necessary?
U.S. forces are still in Syria, but their role has changed substantially in recent weeks. AP Photo/Baderkhan Ahmad

Could Congress reverse Trump’s decision to pull troops out of Syria?

Since the 1940s, Congress has largely let the president make decisions, while members of the House and Senate endorse or condemn those actions from the sidelines.
President Donald Trump simulates a law enforcement officer holding a gun at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Convention in Chicago. If Trump’s support continues to fade, more senators will break from him because their voters demand it. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

If Trump gets impeached, don’t thank the U.S. founders and their elitist constitution

If the U.S. Senate agrees to hear the articles of impeachment for Trump, it is not because of the U.S. founders' commitment to democracy, but rather in spite of their elitist design.
US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press briefing on October 8, 2019. She accused the White House of an “unlawful attempt to hide the facts” after it ruled out cooperating with an impeachment probe of President Donald Trump. Andrew Caballero/AFP

Trump and Nixon: Three key differences between 2019 and 1974

The impeachment investigation of US president Donald Trump has formally started, but much has changed since 1974, when Richard Nixon was forced out of office.
Kentucky Republican Mitch McConnell, the senate majority leader, has a lot of power. AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

If impeachment comes to the Senate – 5 questions answered

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is known as a master of Senate rules. If the House impeaches President Trump, what could he do to influence the process – and outcome – of a trial?
Mary E. Harper (left) and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (right), whose two photos in ‘Atlanta Offering’ are unusual. Unidentified Artist, 1895, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, & Rare Book Library, Emory University

The hidden story of two African-American women looking out from the pages of a 19th-century book

A 19th-century volume contained a mystery for two historians who combined their knowledge to tell the story of the women and their contributions to American democracy.
Union Square: contentious political rallies helped progressive social reformers argue for the protection of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington DC, USA

How New York’s Union Square helped shape free speech in the US

New York's Union Square is an important site in American labor history. One scholar's research illustrates the shifting meanings and inherent tensions of public space as an epicenter of civic life.
The Supreme Court is on summer vacation, but because of John Roberts, they may have to come back. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Roberts rules: The 2 most important Supreme Court decisions this year were about fair elections and the chief justice

Conflict made its way to the Supreme Court this past session with two cases – one about the census, the other about gerrymandering. A court scholar says the two cases are intimately connected.
The civil rights of 11.3 million Mexican nationals who live in the US are routinely violated, according to a comprehensive new report on U.S. immigration enforcement since 2009. AP Photo/Matt York

Mexicans in US routinely confront legal abuse, racial profiling, ICE targeting and other civil rights violations

A new report on Mexicans in the US paints a troubling picture about the treatment of the country's largest immigrant group.
The Supreme Court is empty days before the justices vote to on the U.S. gerrymandering case. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

After Supreme Court decision, gerrymandering fix is up to voters

The Supreme Court has issued what's likely to be its final word on partisan gerrymandering, saying it's a political issue, not a legal one. That means reform lies in the hands of voters.

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