Articles on US Senate health care bill

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For many, the heart of the health care debate is the ability of patients to choose their own health care, including whether to buy insurance and which doctor to see. Alpa Prod/Shutterstock.com

What does choice mean when it comes to health care?

The Republican position on health care has been based upon a belief in individual choice. Here's how their own versions of health care bills eroded choice, however, and how they also did harm.
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) cast the pivotal vote to nix the Senate version of a bill to repeal Obamacare, only days after returning to Washington after surgery. AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Trump isn’t letting Obamacare die; he’s trying to kill it

After the Senate nixed a repeal of Obamacare, Pres. Trump turned to Twitter, vowing to let the law die. But he's actually doing much more. Here's how he's taking an active part in destroying the law.
North Carolina NAACP President Rev. William Barber, accompanied by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas, left, as activists, many with the clergy, are taken into custody by U.S. Capitol Police on Capitol Hill in Washington, July 13, 2017, after protesting against the Republican health care bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why health savings accounts are a bust for the poor but a boost for the privileged

The latest Senate health care bill is still a hodgepodge of efforts to repeal Obamacare, critics say. One of their concerns is the focus on HSAs.
A homeless camp in Los Angeles, where homelessness has risen 23 percent in the past year, in May 2017. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Why poverty is not a personal choice, but a reflection of society

Americans, an independent group, tend to believe that people can "pull themselves up by their boot straps." Yet bigger forces are at play in a person's ability to gain education, a good job and money.
A woman speaks up at a town hall gathering with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-South Carolina) in March 2017. Mark Crammer/AP

How bills to replace Obamacare would especially harm women

Almost nine million women gained insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act. Here's why women could be set back by Republican bills to undo the ACA.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who announced June 27 that a vote on the Senate health care bill has been delayed until after the July 4 recess. Carolyn Kaster/AP

Republican health care bills defy the party’s own ideology

The health care bill proposed by Senate Republicans was little better than the House version, which begs an important question: Who's driving health care law – a free market or insurance companies?

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