Vaccines

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An Ethiopian boy receives a polio vaccination. Africa has done well with polio eradication but lags behind other vaccination efforts. Unicef Ethiopia/2013/Sewunet

African leaders step up to the plate to narrow immunisation gaps

Every year hundreds of thousands of children die from vaccine-preventable diseases. Africa leaders could change this if they improved vaccination efforts.
Nobel Laureate Barry Marshall talks to Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology deputy director of translational research David Handojo Muljono in Indonesia. Supplied

In Conversation with Barry Marshall: using pathogens to help humans

Nobel Laureate Barry Marshal discovered that bacteria called Helicobacter pylori caused peptic ulcers. He is using the same bacteria to create probiotics and edible vaccines.
A women gets an HIV test. Sub-Saharan Africa accounts for the majority of the HIV deaths annually. World Bank Collection/flickr

Two trials signal pivotal point in fight against the AIDS epidemic

Two major clinical trials will be conducted in South Africa in 2016 to test ways of preventing new HIV infections.
Polio vaccinators carry boxes of polio vaccine drops as they head to the areas they have been appointed to administer the vaccine, in Karachi October 21 2014. Akhtar Soomro/Reuters

Could a smartphone app help stop the next polio outbreak in Pakistan?

Researchers are piloting a smartphone app to collect better information about who is getting vaccinated and to design better incentives for health workers on vaccination drives.
‘Leaky vaccines’ don’t affect the ability of the virus to reproduce and spread to others; they simply prevent it from causing disease. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District/Flickr

Are vaccines making viruses more dangerous?

Media coverage of a recent study involving a "leaky" vaccine raised questions about the possibility that they could make viruses more dangerous.
Hepatitis B is commonly transmitted between children, who are not aware that they are carrying the virus. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

Hepatitis B in Africa: the challenges in controlling the scourge

Hepatitis B vaccines have been available for over 20 years but the virus is still endemic in Africa, with the continent carrying over one third of the globe's case load.
A vial of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and an information sheet are seen at Boston Children’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, February 26 2015. Brian Snyder/Reuters

Are US vaccine rates going down because public trust and social ties are eroding?

The anti-vaccination movement is not the cause of falling vaccination rates. It is a symptom of the public’s growing distrust in the government and the medical profession.
Children in particular experience a multitude of viral illnesses during their early years. MIKI Yoshihito/Flickr

Health Check: when are we most likely to catch viral diseases?

Viruses cause all kinds of infections from relatively mild cases of the flu to deadly outbreaks of Ebola. Clearly, not all viruses are equal and one of these differences is when you can infect others.
Military needs drove the development of vaccines we still use today. US troops storming beach via www.shutterstock.com.

How World War II spurred vaccine innovation

During World War II the US military forged partnerships with industry and academia that translated laboratory findings into working products at an unprecedented pace.
Exposing people to weak forms of anti-science arguments can help them respond when they are hit by the real thing. NIAID/Flickr

Inoculating against science denial

A small dose of a weak form of anti-science can inoculate people against the real thing, just like a vaccine.
Can Twitter fill in the gaps for social research? Twitter page via www.shutterstock.com

Survey research can’t capture everyone’s opinion – but Twitter can

Understanding public opinion can help officials target messages during a health crisis. But current survey methods aren't good at generating representative samples. Can Twitter fill in the gaps?

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