Wildlife

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Doing its own thing: the eastern coyote, or coywolf, is a mix of coyote, wolf and dog which has spread across eastern North America. Jonathan Way, www.EasternCoyoteResearch.com

Why the eastern coyote should be a separate species: the ‘coywolf’

A wildlife biologist argues that the canid in eastern North America – known as the eastern coyote, or the coywolf by some – deserves to be classified as a separate species.
They might be eating your home, but termites play a vital role in ecosystems. Termite image from www.shutterstock.com

Hidden housemates: the termites that eat our homes

Termite damage costs Australian homes at least a billion dollars each year – but they are absolutely vital for ecosystems.
White storks on road near Chernobyl, Ukraine. Many parts of the Chernobyl region have low radioactivity levels and serve as refuges for plants and animals. Tim Mousseau

At Chernobyl and Fukushima, radioactivity has seriously harmed wildlife

How do we measure long-term impacts of nuclear accidents? Studies at Chernobyl and Fukushima show that radiation has harmed animals, birds and insects and reduced biodiversity at both sites.
A male African jacana bird mounts a female, but who takes the lead in caring for the young?. Shutterstock/Dave Montreuil

Wild sex: when sex roles get reversed, some females develop a ‘penis’

Sex roles in nature don't always follow the same script. In fact, some females have genitals that resemble a penis. How can this be? Evolution has the answers.
Land clearing rates in Queensland tripled since 2010. Martin Taylor

Queensland land clearing is undermining Australia’s environmental progress

Land clearing in Queensland has tripled in the past five years.

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