Wildlife

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When elephants venture into human settlements, they cause significant damage to crops and property. Shutterstock

Why it might take more than the buzz of bees to ward off elephants

Elephant numbers are increasing in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Their search for food is leading them into conflict with farmers living adjacent to game parks. Bees could prove to be the answer to the problem.
Near threatened: The Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is now part of a plan to save the species and restore a wider conservation area at Mulligans Flat. Wikimedia/JJ Harrison

Extinction means more than a loss of species to Australia’s delicate ecosystems

Most wildlife plays a key role in any ecosystem. So when one becomes extinct, it can impact their habitat. And we're now finding we may have lost more species in Australia than first thought.
The remote rivers of northern Australia could be home to untold numbers of new and threatened fish. Matthew Le Feuvre

We discovered 20 new fish in northern Australia – now we need to protect them

A score of new fish species discovered recently in northern Australia remind us how little we know about our country.
As a generalist predator, spiders, like this Western Rough Wolf Spider, help limit the number of insects in your garden. Jean and Fred/Flickr

Spiders are a treasure trove of scientific wonder

Only two Australian spiders can kill you, but the rest are a pretty fascinating bunch.
The debate on whether animals should be kept in captivity or not continues to rage on. Reuters/Muhammad Hamed

Carnivores in captivity: a question of motive and ethics

Some say that keeping wild animals in captivity is cruel. Others believe they promote conservation and give people a link to nature.

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