Articles on Yemen

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A Yemeni national, denied entry into the U.S. because of the travel ban, shows their cancelled visa to reporters as they successfully arrive at Washington Dulles International Airport. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/Files

What Trump’s travel ban really looks like, almost two years in

Was the ban a Muslim ban -- or was that just an anti-Trump narrative? A political scientist combs through the data for answers.
In this August 2018 photo, Yemeni people attend the funeral of victims of a Saudi Arabia-led airstrike in Saada, Yemen. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Trading values to sell weapons: The Canada-Saudi relationship

A year after an infamous Twitter spat and the gruesome murder of Jamal Khashoggi in 2018, the Canada-Saudi relationship appears poised to return to business as usual, if it hasn't already.
The attack on the Abqaiq oil facilities in Saudi Arabia has sparked geopolitical tensions but has had only a minor impact on oil prices. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

Attacks on Saudi oil – why didn’t prices go crazy?

Energy-wise, the fallout from the attack on Saudi oil facilities has so far been very muted. The surge in oil production in the US over the past decade helps explain why.
Bahrain’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Shaikh Khalid bin Ahmed bin Mohammed Al Khalifa gave an interview to Israel’s Channel 13 in June – a first. Screenshot, Official Youtube of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kingdom of Bahrain

Why increasing Arab-Israeli closeness matters

With the opening of a synagogue in Dubai and warmer relations between Saudi Arabia and Israel, some Arab states suddenly appear to be more open to friendship with Israel and Jews. Why?
The New IRA apologized for killing investigative journalist Lyra McKee during a riot in Derry. Reuters/Charles McQuillan

Why do rebel groups apologize?

Organizations try to hide mistakes and evade responsibility, studies show. But two scholars analyzing militant and terrorist groups say they are willing to acknowledge their mistakes – sometimes.
Yemen’s al-Qaida branch, called al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, is the most dangerous and sophisticated offshoot of the terror group Osama bin Laden founded in Afghanistan in 1988. AP Photo/Hani Mohammed

Al-Qaida is stronger today than it was on 9/11

Bin Laden's extremist group had less than a hundred members in September 2001. Today it's a transnational terror organization with 40,000 fighters across the Middle East, Africa and beyond.
In this October 2016 photo, fire and smoke rise after a Saudi-led airstrike hit a site believed to be one of the largest weapons depots on the outskirts of Yemen’s capital, Sanaa. Approximately 70,000 people have been estimated to have died in Yemen’s civil war – and Canada is complicit. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File)

Canada’s labour movement must take a stand against the Saudi arms deal

Why is Canada's labour movement so quiet on the Saudi arms deal? It should be a voice for peace and human rights and demand that the Canadian government immediately cancel the deal.
Police officers loyal to the Houthi rebels march during a military parade in Sanaa, Yemen in July 2017. The placards read: ‘Allah is the greatest. Death to America, death to Israel, a curse on the Jews, victory to Islam.’ REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah

Congressional action on Yemen may be the first salvo against presidential war powers

Political fallout from the Vietnam War gave Congress more power to control foreign affairs, but they have been reluctant to use it.
Severe malnutrition, like this Yemeni boy experienced, is one of the results of the Yemen conflict. AP/Hani Mohammed

Senate vote could end US complicity in the Saudi-led genocide in Yemen

The US has supported a Saudi-led military coalition that has inflicted profound and deadly damage on Yemen. A Senate vote could end what a human rights scholar says is US complicity in genocide.
Supporters of Shiite Houthi rebels attend a rally in Sanaa, Yemen, in 2017. AP Photo/Hani Mohammed, File

Who are Yemen’s Houthis?

The Houthis belong to the Shiite branch of Islam. The Houthi insurgency began in the early 1990s, spurred in part by growing influence of different Sunni branches of Islam.
Saleh Hassan al-Faqeh holds the hand of his 4-month-old daughter, Hajar, who died at the malnutrition ward of al-Sabeen Hospital in Sanaa, Yemen, Nov. 15, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed al-Sayaghi

US complicity in the Saudi-led genocide in Yemen spans Obama, Trump administrations

The Obama and Trump administrations have supported a military coalition that has inflicted profound and deadly damage on Yemen. A human rights scholar says the US is complicit in genocide.

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