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Articles on Asylum-seekers

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Most countries closed their borders, at least partially, at some point last year. But the world is starting to reopen. COVID Border Accountability Project

Closed borders, travel bans and halted immigration: 5 ways COVID-19 changed how – and where – people move around the world

Last year, 189 countries – home to roughly 65% of the global population – cut themselves off from the world at some point. Borders are now reopening and travel resuming, but normal is a ways off.
The first group of asylum-seekers allowed to cross from a migrant camp in Mexico into the United States following Biden’s repeal of the ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy arrives to Brownsville, Texas, Feb. 25, 2021. John Moore/Getty Images

Biden ends policy forcing asylum-seekers to ‘remain in Mexico’ – but for 41,247 migrants, it’s too late

Luck and tenacity paid off for some 15,000 migrants who may now pursue their asylum cases in the US But nearly 42,000 cases filed from Mexico under a Trump-era rule were already rejected.
An undocumented immigrant who has lived in the U.S. for 28 years shows a picture of her grandchild and son, who was deported under Trump’s ‘zero tolerance’ policy in 2017. John Moore/Getty Images

Severed families, raided workplaces and a climate of fear: Assessing Trump’s immigration crackdown

Trump made three anti-immigration pledges in 2016: ban Muslims, build a wall and enforce all immigration laws. Four years on, a migration scholar examines his record – and its effect on the country.
The pandemic and anti-immigration policies haven’t stopped migration from Central America – they’ve just made conditions at the border more hazardous. Herika Martinez/AFP via Getty Images

Migrant caravans restart as pandemic deepens the humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border

COVID-19 has created new hardships for migrants while giving the Trump administration an excuse to further restrict asylum as public attention focuses on the pandemic.
People march towards Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland’s office in Toronto during a rally led by current and former international students calling for changes to immigration rules during COVID-19 on Sept. 12, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

COVID-19 has hardened Canadian views on immigration

Pandemic fears could permanently harden Canadian attitudes toward immigration, and generate pressure to reduce the number of yearly arrivals.
Protesters attend a demonstration in support of migrant worker in front of the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada in Toronto in August 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Throne speech offers little systemic change for migrant workers, refugees

The federal government must make good on its throne speech language about making it easier for migrant workers to formally become Canadian by instituting a comprehensive regularization plan.
In this August 2017 photo, Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers greet migrants as they enter into Canada at an unofficial border crossing at the end of Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., on the Québec border. A federal court has invalidated Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Canadian court correctly finds the U.S. is unsafe for refugees

The Canadian government should send a clear signal that it cares about constitutional and international law, heed a Federal Court ruling and take steps to immediately suspend the STCA.
Protesters stand outside the Federal Court of Canada building for a hearing of the designation of the U.S. as a safe third country for refugees in Toronto in November 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Whose travel is ‘essential’ during coronavirus: Hockey players or asylum-seekers?

Many of us would probably like to watch some professional sports right now. But wouldn’t we rather Canada live up to its international legal responsibilities to respect the rights of asylum-seekers?
Protesters in Hong Kong during demonstrations against China’s draft bill to impose national security laws on the semi-autonomous territory. Ivan Abreu/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Why Hong Kong’s untold history of protecting refugee rights matters now in its struggle with China

The cherished legal rights that Beijing seeks to suppress in Hong Kong were established, in part, by Vietnamese asylum-seekers who fought for their freedom in court in the 1980s.
In this March 2018 photo, Venezuelan children wait for a meal at a migrant shelter set up in Boa Vista, Roraima state, Brazil. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

Brazil’s humane refugee policies: Good ideas can travel north

If Brazil can find an efficient, pragmatic way to welcome, protect and integrate hundreds of thousands of forced migrants arriving at its border, so can more affluent states.
Street gangs that operate with impunity make El Salvador one of the world’s most violent countries. Few murders are ever solved. MARVIN RECINOS/AFP via Getty Images

Deported to death: US sent 138 Salvadorans home to be killed

A new Human Rights Watch report finds many Salvadoran deportees are killed once home, often by the gangs they fled. Rampant impunity means El Salvador can’t protect vulnerable people from violence.
A new Trump ruling will prohibit virtually all Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the United States. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

The Bible says to welcome refugees

Scripture strongly and unequivocally affirms the obligation to treat strangers with dignity and hospitality, says a Christian scholar who turns to the Bible for guidance on Trump’s immigration policy.
Kimora Adetunji, 33, is seen with her son King, 2, outside Federal Court in Toronto in May 2017, where indefinite immigration detention was subject of a court hearing. Her husband was detained for almost a year before being released. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel

A world without immigration detention is possible

Migration governance without immigration detention is desirable and achievable. Eliminating all detention will universally benefit citizens, migrants and everyone in between.
In this August 2017 photo, an RCMP officer informs a migrant couple of the location of a legal border station, shortly before they illegally crossed from Champlain, N.Y., to Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Charles Krupa

Closing the Canada-U.S. asylum border agreement loophole? Not so fast

Canada wants to expand a Canada-U.S. pact to make it tougher for asylum-seekers from the U.S. to come to Canada. The question is: What will Canada have to give the United States to get them to agree?
Migrants from Honduras, part of the Central American caravan, trying to reach the United States in Tijuana, Mexico, in December 2018. Reuters/Mohammed Salem

Is there a crisis at the US-Mexico border? 6 essential reads

Immigration experts explain who’s really trying to cross the US-Mexico border, what they want — and why immigration, even undocumented immigration, actually benefits the country.
In this Nov. 25, 2018 photo, a Honduran migrant converses with U.S border agents on the other side of razor wire after they fired tear gas at migrants pressuring to cross into the U.S. from Tijuana, Mexico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

The bogus demonization of the ‘migrant caravan’

The Donald Trump administration is repelling asylum-seekers by any means necessary, treating them as invaders and using military rhetoric to demonize them. It’s time for reality to prevail.
Migrants travel in groups through Mexico for safety reasons. But Mexico is still one of the world’s most dangerous countries. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Dozens of migrants disappear in Mexico as Central American caravan pushes northward

Two trucks carrying migrants have gone missing in Veracruz, Mexico. A witness says that ‘65 children and seven women were sold’ to a band of armed men. Other caravan members have reached the border.

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