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Articles on Australian history

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Sheas Creek runs into Alexandra Canal. Photo: Ilaria Vanni

Bell frogs, dugong bones and giant cauliflowers: water stories come to life at Green Square

Long before Green Square was a huge urban renewal project it was Country known to Traditional Owners for its wetlands. Until now, those water stories have remained largely invisible.
Prime Minister Anthony Albanese with Yothu Yindi board member Djaawa Yunupingu during the Garma Festival in northeast Arnhem Land, where he announced his plan for a referendum on the Indigenous Voice to Parliament. Aaron Bunch/AAP

The power of yindyamarra: how we can bring respect to Australian democracy

Liberal democracy has been a failure for First Nations people – a Voice to Parliament must add more weight to the scales.
‘Trucked Off to Brewarrina Mission’, Wanaaring 1938. 1 of 6 images by May Hunt. Photo first published in the New Dawn, January 1974. Originally incorrectly attributed to Ron Riley. This was included in the ‘Looking Through Windows’ exhibition courtesy of Harold Hunt and family.

An Ode To My Grandmother: remaking the past using oral histories, theatre and music

Indigenous oral history is more than a methodology. It is living history, practised for thousands of millennia, intrinsically woven into Aboriginal people’s way of life and culture.
‘Peace for our time’: British prime minister Neville Chamberlain displaying the Anglo-German declaration, known as the Munich Agreement, in September 1938. Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images

Are we learning the wrong lessons from history?

Oversimplified versions of the past lead to bad political decisions.
Tracker Nat, holding his hat on the far left, with Paul Hasluck standing next to him, holding Nat’s shield in this picture from 1958. National Archives of Australia. NAA: A1200, L28199.

Rediscovering the art of Tracker Nat: ‘the Namatjira of carving’

During the 1950s, Nat made hundreds of carvings. Today, many of these are likely to be lying unidentified in people’s homes and in museum basements.

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