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Articles on Cancer drugs

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SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
The effectiveness of a drug may be evaluated based on its potential to shrink tumours – but this doesn’t necessarily equate to improved survival rates. From shutterstock.com

Do new cancer drugs work? Too often we don’t really know (and neither does your doctor)

National drug regulators use evidence from clinical trials to decide whether new cancer drugs will be approved for use. But these studies are often flawed.
Having cancer is bad enough, and dealing with the costs and confusion of billing systems makes things harder. KieferPix/Shutterstock.com

Confusing and high bills for cancer patients add to anxiety and suffering

A cancer diagnosis is one of the scariest of all. The pain and fear are worsened by a confusing landscape of bills, opaque billing systems and changing insurance rules, rates and reimbursements.
Applications to list drugs on the PBS are usually submitted by the manufacturers of those drugs. from shutterstock.com

We don’t need to change how we subsidise ‘breakthrough’ cancer treatments

Some argue the current system of subsidising drugs in Australia needs changing to accommodate new cancer therapies. But two recent drug listings show the current system is working perfectly well.
Most common childhood cancers are leukemia and Hodgkin lymphoma. Shutterstock

How poverty is killing Kenya’s children with cancer

Most children who have cancer live in the developing world where their survival rate is less than 25%. In Kenya awareness about childhood cancer is low and treatment isn't always readily available.
Some people taking these drugs can see their cancer completely disappear – there’s nothing left to see on their x-rays. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Cancer immunotherapy drugs like Keytruda and Opdivo hold hope for some, but there’s still a way to go

Imagine being able to offer hope to people with cancers once thought untreatable. Checkpoint immune drugs like Opdivo and Keytruda lead this new era in treatment. But they don't work for everyone.
Therapies on a nano scale rely on engineered nanoparticles designed to package and deliver drugs to exactly where they’re needed. from shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is nanomedicine and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment?

Nanoparticles are a form of transport for drugs and can go places drugs wouldn't be able to go on their own. They make drug delivery more targeted, reducing collateral damage to healthy tissues.
The US National Cancer Institute tested tens of thousands of plants and made this miraculous find. Het Spul/Flickr

Weekly dose: Taxol, the anticancer drug discovered in the bark of a tree

The US National Cancer Institute screened 35,000 plants, but one particular sample collected from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree provided what is now one of the most highly prescribed cancer drugs.
A group of oncologists have called on cancer patients to challenge the high prices charged by pharmaceutical companies for new cancer drugs. ep_jhu/Flickr

If we don’t talk about value, cancer drugs will become terminal for health systems

Hope, fear, and desperation, along with the unique characteristics of the cancer drug market, create a “perfect storm” that continues to drive up prices for cancer drugs.

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