Articles on Ebola

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Medical staff strike over coronavirus concerns in Hong Kong. Hospital workers are demanding the border with mainland China be shut completely to ward off the virus. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

Coronavirus: The latest disease to fuel mistrust, fear and racism

The prevalence of racism and scapegoating in the face of catastrophes and disasters has a much longer history than the new coronavirus outbreak.
A horseshoe bat chasing a moth. Horseshoe bats were the source of SARS. Scientists consider bats to be a possible source of coronavirus. DE AGOSTINI PICTURE LIBRARY / Contributor

A clue to stopping coronavirus: Knowing how viruses adapt from animals to humans

Some of the world's worst diseases have come from animals. Bats, cows, camels and horses have all contributed. Now, scientists are working to know which animal introduced the new coronavirus.
Cambodian high-school students line up to sanitize their hands to avoid coronavirus in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. AP Photo/Heng Sinith

Coronavirus: Fear of a pandemic, or a pandemic of fear?

China's coronavirus outbreak is stoking fears that it could become the next great global pandemic. As the World Health Organization declares a global emergency, it's also fanning a pandemic of fear.
UNICEF carers at a creche for children whose parents are being treated for Ebola. Building health infrastructure is crucial to stopping the next outbreak. Epa/ Hugh Kinsella Cunningham

Investing in health systems is the only way to stop the next Ebola outbreak

The emergency in the DRC shows that despite all these positive changes, the global response to containing Ebola outbreaks is undermined by the lack of health care and public health infrastructure.
A health worker spreading disinfectant at a health checkpoint in Goma, DRC. Patricia Martinez/EPA-EFE

Ebola survivors can pass on the virus: we’re trying to understand what role sex plays

Nearly everything known about Ebola virus persistence in the reproductive system has resulted from testing semen of West African Ebola virus disease survivors.

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