Articles on Pravin Gordhan

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South African President Jacob Zuma, flanked by ANC Secretary-General Gwede Mantashe (left) and Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

South Africa’s politicians will have to adjust to many more coalitions

A key question ahead of local government elections in South Africa is whether the African National Congress will retain control of seven of the country's eight metropolitan municipalities.
South Africa’s Finance Minister, Pravin Gordhan, left, chats with Lesetja Kganyago, Governor of the Reserve Bank of South Africa. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

South Africa faces difficult times, but disaster is not inevitable

Pessimists aren't asking if the glass in South Africa is half full. They want to know if there's anything in the glass. The answer is a pleasant surprise.
South Africans would have taken comfort if their finance minister had given assurances that there would be no more wasteful expenditure on South African Airways. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

South Africa’s 2016 budget lacked urgency and conviction

South Africa's finance minister claimed that a number of initiatives were in place to ensure that policies are actually implemented. But they were too broad and lacked urgency and conviction.
Fixing South Africa’s perilous education system will involve building consensus – a time-consuming process. Reuters/Rogan Ward

Too many economic cooks add to South Africa’s policy uncertainty

South Africa's government should put more effort into developing concrete strategies for dealing with the factors preventing the removal of the critical constraints on economic growth.
Finance minister Pravin Gordhan’s budget speech has put the ANC government’s plan to fight poverty and reduce inequality back in the spotlight. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

South Africa’s budget hits right notes but won’t stave off downgrade

Finance minister Pravin Gordhan would need President Zuma’s undivided support to drive bold economic reforms. But, signs suggest that he does not have such support and is undermined by the president.
South African finance minister Pravin Gordhan had to tread carefully to please many competing interests in his budget. shutterstock

South African finance minister forced to walk a difficult political tightrope

South Africa's finance minister means well, especially in his bid to cut public sector expenditure. But his success requires strong leadership and strategic alignment across the entire public sector.
An upbeat Pravin Gordhan, South Africa’s finance minister (left) arrives to deliver his 2016 budget address to parliament in Cape Town. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

South Africa budget 2016: nifty political footwork may not be enough

Cutting the bloated public service wage bill, as the finance minister is doing, is critically important economically. But it is sure to be unpopular with the governing ANC's powerful labour allies.
South Africa’s Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan delivers his 2016 budget address to parliament in Cape Town. Reuters/Mike Hutchings

South Africa’s finance minister tackles wastage, boosts confidence

South Africa's finance minister delivered a good mix of macro and micro-economic strategies to ensure the country survives economic uncertainty, restores confidence and achieves some growth.
Pravin Gordhan is considered an independent mind. His return as South Africa’s finance minister will boost investor confidence. EPA/Dai Kurokawa

Zuma’s about-turn shows power of the South African media, and the markets

South Africa has had three finance ministers in four days. President Jacob Zuma will live with the fall-out for the rest of his term. Markets have a long-term memory and won't easily forget.
The Union Buildings in Pretoria, home to South Africa’s government. Public confidence in civil servants has been severely eroded. Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

South Africa needs a professional civil service

Political factors have played a disproportionate role in decisions on the promotion, transfer and performance assessments of government officials.

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