Environment + Energy – Articles, Analysis, Comment

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Most of the time you won’t be able to tell if a puppy or kitten’s tooth falls out. Often they fall out in food, or the animal might even swallow them. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: Do cats and dogs lose baby teeth like people do?

Puppies and kittens are born without teeth, but by around two months of age they have a full set of baby teeth.
Wollemi pines once covered prehistoric Australia. The Conversation/Wikipedia

Wollemi pines are dinosaur trees

Wollemi pines have survived for hundreds of millions of years. Once covering Australia, they now survive in a few isolated spots – but they're coming back in a big way.
The latest research suggests that in Australia, rooftop solar photovoltaics are more likely to be adopted by middle-class households.

Are solar panels a middle-class purchase? This survey says yes

Households that are most likely to go solar are those that can afford solar panels, but aren't so rich that they don't have to worry about their electricity bill at all, says a survey of 8,000 homes.
According to a recent report, New Zealand will need to increase renewable electricity generation, plant more trees and continue switching to electric transport more rapidly to achieve its zero carbon goal by 2050. from www.shutterstock.com

New Zealand’s productivity commission charts course to low-emission future

New Zealand has set itself a goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050, and a recent report by the Productivity Commission lays out how it could hit that target.
Mala, also known as rufous hare-wallabies, will be protected behind an enormous cat-proof fence. Donald Hobern/Flickr

The future is fenced for Australian animals

Conservation fences create a few hundred square kilometres of safety for vulnerable native animals surrounded by 7.6 million lethal square kilometres.
Crowdfunded campaigns to save the orange-bellied parrot are a rare ray of hope. Fatih Sam

Crowdfunded campaigns are conserving the Earth’s environment

When environmental needs outstrip government funds, people power steps up.