Articles on Autonomous vehicles

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How much would you trust a driverless car? Shutterstock/metamorworks

We asked people if they would trust driverless cars

Do people really trust driverless cars to carry them safely to their destinations? New research shows that we are ready to use driverless cars in certain situations but not others, yet.
Self-driving cars and human-driven vehicles are bound to collide as the technology improves. Tempe Police Department via AP

Self-driving cars and humans face inevitable collisions

Humans and machines perceive the world differently and respond in different ways to what they perceive. This lays the groundwork for conflict – and crashes.
Would you be – or feel – safer if one of these people were a robot? Skycolors/Shutterstock.com

Your next pilot could be drone software

Airplanes could be safer with technology at the helm. A key sticking point is human opinion.
An autonomous vehicle struck and killed a pedestrian on March 18. ABC-15.com via AP

After Tempe fatality, self-driving car developers must engage with public now or risk rejection

Companies developing autonomous vehicles are missing out on the local knowledge and values of the people who live where these cars are tested. And that lack of engagement sets up bigger problems.
There are calls for strong action, including criminal prosecution, following a fatal accident involving an Uber self-driving car. Uber

Legal lessons for Australia from Uber’s self-driving car fatality

Elaine Herzberg's death will provide the impetus for clearer liability rules for self-driving cars. Australia is wise to adopt a wait-and-watch approach and maintain its human-first orientation.
Autonomous vehicles are information-rich platforms thanks to the range of sensors on board that track, monitor and measure everything. Uber

Who’s to blame when driverless cars have an accident?

Sensors that monitor everything a self-driving vehicle does can help determine who is responsible in the case of an accident – the manufacturer, the service centre or the vehicle owner.
Four major disruptions of urban transport are set to transform city life, but exactly how remains uncertain. Taras Makarenko/Pexels

Utopia or nightmare? The answer lies in how we embrace self-driving, electric and shared vehicles

Self-driving, shared, electric vehicles and increasing urban density represent four disruptions that will transform city life. But a transport utopia isn't a guaranteed outcome of their interactions.
The South Korean go player Lee Sedol after a 2016 match against Google’s artificial-intelligence program AlphaGo. Sedol, ranked 9th in the world, lost 4-1. Lee Jin-man/Flickr

No, artificial intelligence won’t steal your children’s jobs – it will make them more creative and productive

The history of human-machine collaboration suggests that AI will evolve into a "cognitive partner" to humankind rather than as all-powerful, all-knowing, labour replacing robots.
A key factor is how well people and machines can avoid crashes. Tempe Police Department via AP

Are autonomous cars really safer than human drivers?

Comparing crash rates between humans and self-driving cars requires more data than anyone currently collects. And some of it will be quite hard to figure out.
Tech companies want to reduce conflict between texting and driving. Tero Vesalainen/Shutterstock.com

Why Silicon Valley wants you to text and drive

Why do tech companies care so much about self-driving cars? If drivers no longer need to pay attention to the road, they can use their mobile devices even more.
When self-driving cars get in crashes, who’s to blame? Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority via AP

Redefining ‘safety’ for self-driving cars

If autonomous vehicles are going to be safer than human drivers, they'll need to improve their ability to perceive and understand their surroundings – and become the ultimate defensive drivers.

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