Menu Close

Articles on Beaches

Displaying 1 - 20 of 30 articles

Shutterstock

One of Australia’s most famous beaches is disappearing, and storms aren’t to blame. So what’s the problem?

Over the past six months, tourists and locals have been shocked to see Byron's famous Main Beach literally disappearing. Satellite imagery and local knowledge has revealed what's going on.
A sand mine in Nepal. Growing urbanization and its need for concrete is fuelling a global sand crisis. (Michael Hoffmann)

Roving bandits and looted coastlines: How the global appetite for sand is fuelling a crisis

As sand markets boom, entrepreneurs, organized crime and others are cashing in — leaving widespread environmental damage in their wake.
This started as a mountain range. Bas Meelker/Shutterstock.com

Where does beach sand come from?

Sand may seem abundant when your toes are buried in it, but it's becoming scarce along many coastlines around the world.
Surf threatens beach houses on Dauphin Island, Alabama, September 4, 2011 during Tropical Storm Lee. AP Photo/Dave Martin

Why are Atlantic and Gulf coast property owners building back bigger after hurricanes?

'Building back better' refers to making communities more disaster-proof and resilient after they take a hit. But instead, some US owners are building back bigger homes in vulnerable places.
Raw sewage from 3,500 people in Sydney’s affluent eastern suburbs is discharged directly into the ocean. Will Turner/Unsplash

Australia’s pristine beaches have a poo problem

Sydney's affluent eastern suburbs have raw and untreated sewage from 3,500 people discharged directly into the Tasman Sea.
Tourist are a high-risk group for drownings. (Shutterstock)

Why your tourist brain may try to drown you

Just because a beach is accessible, has restaurants, lounge chairs and vendors, and is near a resort, does not mean it's safe.
How much should a council pay to protect private beachfront properties? AAP Image/Nearmap

Building sea walls is a small bandaid on a gaping wound

How far will we go to protect high-risk beachfront property? New research suggests local councils are too willing to spend public money to protect private landowners from coastal climate change.

Top contributors

More