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Articles on CEO

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French-language advocates protest Air Canada’s chief executive Michael Rousseau’s inability to speak French in front of the airline’s head office during a demonstration in Montréal. The sign reads: “Rousseau Get Out.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Corporate leadership: Why the tone at the top has moral consequences

What CEOs say and how they say it are essential. Their words can set the tone at the top of the firm and have far-reaching repercussions.
CEOs have to show they’re serious about diversity for their human resources managers to do so. That could involve tying compensation to diversity targets. (Shutterstock)

If CEOs want to promote diversity, they have to ‘walk the talk’

How human resources managers assess their CEO’s true intentions on diversity are crucial to understanding whether an organization’s diversity agenda will be followed.
Corporations are increasingly calling on governments to act on climate change, even if it doesn’t benefit them. EdG2s/Wikimedia

Here’s how to convince CEOs to support government climate action at the expense of their own profits

Research suggests that corporate leaders can be encouraged to lobby for climate action by personally experiencing the effects of climate change.
Students at Ecole Polytechnique. Their alumni network is one of the most powerful and may lead some to the top of a large French company. J. Barande/École Polytechnique

France’s elite schools and their alumni networks: a flaw in the governance of French companies

When the directors of a company are graduates of the same school as the executive, their ability to hold the executive accountable for his or her decisions becomes compromised.
CEOs have diverse opinions about the effectiveness of remote work. (Mohammad Shahhosseini/Unsplash)

What Canada’s top CEOs think about remote work

Research and surveys show that many Canadian employees want to continue to work from home, at least sometimes, following the pandemic. But what do CEOs think?
In this 2019 promotional photo from McDonald’s, then CEO Steve Easterbrook, fourth from the left, celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Big Mac with family members of the McDonald’s employee who invented the popular sandwich. Easterbrook has since been dismissed from McDonald’s for inappropriate behaviour. (Peter Wynn Thompson/AP Images for McDonald's)

How good governance can stop toxic ‘bro behaviour’ at companies

Bad behaviour and toxic culture at a company can be corrected if the organization’s board of directors states clearly the values they are looking for in a CEO.
McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook was terminated by his board after admitting to a consensual relationship with another company employee. (Alyssa Schukar/AP Images for McDonald's)

McDonald’s upheaval is a stern reminder to CEOs about ethics

The attitudes and behaviour of employees are impacted much more strongly by the actions of their bosses than by their words. And the CEO is the most visible and powerful role model of all.

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