Articles on Cybercrime

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Staff at the Korea Internet and Security Agency in Seoul, South Korea monitor possible ransomware cyberattacks in May 2017. (Yun Dong-jin/Yonhap via AP)

Ransomware like Bad Rabbit is big business

Like legitimate e-commerce, ransomware e-crime is increasing in scale, value and sophistication.
There’s a global war going on, and a global arms race to go with it. It’s not a race for physical weapons, it’s a race to develop cyber weapons of psychological, emotional, financial and infrastructure attack. (Shutterstock)

World War Three is being waged in cyberspace

Hostile foreign powers and even tech companies are not attacking us with bullets and bombs; they're doing it with bits and bytes. It's Cyber Security Awareness Month, so what to do about the third world war being waged in cyberspace?
More cryptocurrencies appear all the time. Wit Olszewski/Shutterstock.com

Are cryptocurrencies a dream come true for cyber-extortionists?

Cybercriminals increasingly depend on e-currencies to profit from their misdeeds. They, and their potential victims, could be driving some of the growth in cryptocurrency markets.
Though popular culture might suggest otherwise, cyberbullying isn’t just a white problem. tommaso79/shutterstock.com

Race, cyberbullying and intimate partner violence

A recent Pew survey reported that young African-Americans are more likely to be both victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying. Why?
Not all hackers can be bad for an organisation: the white hat or ethical hacker can help. Shutterstock/napocska

An ethical hacker can help you beat a malicious one

Simply updating and patching an organisation's computer software may not be enough to fend off another cyber attack. You could engage an ethical hacker to help out.
The market for exploiting software vulnerabilities can be traced back to the 90s where “phreaking” - modifying telecommunications technology - was popular. Jennifer/Flickr

What the underground market for ransomware looks like

The underground market for software vulnerabilities has been growing steadily since the 1990s, so the latest WannaCry could be a sign of things to come.

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