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Articles on Disaster preparedness

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Mark Poindexter puts a tarp on the damaged roof of his home in Gulf Breeze, Louisiana, on Aug. 29, 2020, in the aftermath of Hurricane Laura. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Hurricanes, wildfires, tornadoes, floods – whatever your local risk, here’s how to be more weather-ready

Federal weather scientists are pushing to make the US more 'weather-ready,' which could mean prepping for fires, flooding or storms depending on where you live. The common factor: thinking ahead.
Debris near Lebanon, Tennessee, after tornadoes struck on the night of March 3, 2020, killing more than 20 people across the state. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

Wild weather: 4 essential reads about tornadoes and thunderstorms

With the onset of spring come thunderstorms, and sometimes tornadoes. Learn how these systems form and why night tornadoes are especially deadly.
Peter Tully, QDN Peer Leader in conversation with Kristie McKenna, Emergency Manager, Ipswich Council discussing disability inclusive disaster risk reduction. www.collaborating4inclusion.org

3 things we can do now to help people with disability prepare for disaster

Disability-inclusive disaster planning means people get support matched to their needs, frees up emergency services and makes emergency managers’ jobs easier. It boosts disaster resilience for everyone.
Located on the Ring of Fire, Indonesia is prone to natural disasters, particularly earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis. YT Haryono/Reuters

Why political will is important to reduce risks of disaster

What is political will or political commitment to disaster risk reduction? Why is it important to measure political commitment? And how to measure it?
Air raid wardens in Washington, D.C., conduct a practice air raid. Office for Emergency Management, Office of War Information/National Archives

Cold War-style preparedness could help fight future pandemics

Since the Cold War, Americans have shifted from engaging in active self-rescue to passively waiting for help from a centralized, bureaucratic federal emergency response.
Dr. Aimee Sisson, a public health officer in Placer County, Calif., answers a question about the death of an elderly patient in Auburn, Calif., March 4, 2020. AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Crisis communication researcher shares 5 key principles that officials should use in coronavirus

Communication from public health and government officials during a health threat is a critical component of preventing and treating a disease. An expert who worked on the anthrax scare explains.
The Immaculate Conception Catholic Church lies in ruins after a magnitude 6.4 earthquake in Guayanilla, Puerto Rico, Jan. 7, 2020. AP Photo/Carlos Giusti

Earthquake forecast for Puerto Rico: Dozens more large aftershocks are likely

Puerto Rico's January earthquakes came after many foreshocks and have been followed by numerous aftershocks. Scientists are studying these sequences to improve earthquake forecasting.
Many houses still do not have cyclone-ready roofs, so are liable to lose them if hit by the full force of the storm. Dan Peled/AAP

Homes can be better prepared for cyclones. But first we must convince the owners

Most homes are not as cyclone-ready as they could be. It seems lower insurance premiums aren't enough of an incentive for owners to upgrade their homes, but a new study points to some solutions.

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