Ecology

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Demand is growing for statistical ecologists to research climate change. Rapidly growing mega-cities in Africa, like Lagos, face the highest risks. Reuters/Akintunde Akinleye

What’s on the to-do list for Africa’s statistical ecologists

Some of the most in-demand ecologists in Africa are specialists in statistics. But this is currently a scarce skill combination in Africa.
In a sense, aren’t they one and the same? 'Heads' via www.shutterstock.com

Why it’s impossible to actually be a vegetarian

When you think about it, it's a bit strange to view food through a lens of "meat" and "not meat" – especially when plants consume animals, and vice versa.
Spiny water flea (Bythotrephes longimanus). Jake R. Walsh

Tiny flea reveals the devastating costs of invasive species

Invasive species cause some $120 billion in damages across North America yearly -- and that's just direct costs. A study of one species in one Wisconsin lake indicates the real toll is much higher.
Modern day ecology involves large collaborations, such as this team at the Ethabuka South Site as part of the Nutrient Network. Glenda Wardle

Gone is the solitary genius – science today is a group effort

Where once scientists used to be solitary creatures, today science is a highly collaborative affair, and the latest research in ecology is no exception.
The world’s driest areas are tipped to get even drier, with potentially worrying implications for soil productivity.

If the world’s soils keep drying out that’s bad news for microbes (and people)

The world's 'drylands' – already home to 38% of the world's people – are set to dry out even more. And that could harm the soil microbes that keep soils healthy and help crops to grow.
Near threatened: The Tasmanian Bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is now part of a plan to save the species and restore a wider conservation area at Mulligans Flat. Wikimedia/JJ Harrison

Extinction means more than a loss of species to Australia’s delicate ecosystems

Most wildlife plays a key role in any ecosystem. So when one becomes extinct, it can impact their habitat. And we're now finding we may have lost more species in Australia than first thought.
View of Port Jackson, Fort Macquarie and part of Sydney Cove, in 1836. Govett, William Romaine/National Library

Charles Darwin’s evolutionary revelation in Australia

Charles Darwin visited Australia 180 years ago, and while here, he had a revelation that helped spark his insight into evolution by natural selection.
Kisses aren’t the only magic that happens under Australian mistletoe. Margaret Donald/Flickr

Mistletoe: the kiss of life for healthy forests

In many parts of the world, Christmas and mistletoe are inextricably intertwined. But in the natural world, mistletoe has long fascinated naturalists and scientists.

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