Articles on Paris 2015 climate summit

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Evacuees gather at a rescue centre after this month’s floods in the Philippines. But for many women the danger doesn’t end here. EPA/Francis R. Malasig/AAP

Worldwide, climate change is worse news for women

Climate change isn't gender-neutral. The effects are likely to hit the world's poorest women hardest of all, because they are more likely to lack the resources to escape natural disasters or disease.
Coal no more? The rise of renewables and climate action will spell an end to Australia’s coal industry. Coal image from www.shutterstock.com

The long-term future of Australian coal is drying up

Australia's failure to reassess its commitment to coal will have serious negative consequences, not only for Australia’s economy, but for the health and well being of millions of people and the global environment.
The Copenhagen talks generated huge interest - but an underwhelming result. EPA/Jens Norgaard Larsen

The Conversation heads to the Paris climate talks

The stakes could scarcely be higher at December's climate summit in Paris, described as the world's best chance of averting climate catastrophe. The Conversation will be there to see if the talks can deliver.
India’s main aim is to get electricity to more of the population - using renewables where possible. Jorge Royan/Wikimedia Commons

India chooses electricity and economics over emissions goals

India has pledged to ramp up renewable energy and make its economy more carbon-efficient. And while that will help cut emissions, the main motivation is to give power to the many who still lack access to electricity.
Malcolm Turnbull, as a former investment banker, should be able to feel the prevailing global winds around climate finance. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Australia’s climate policy is messier than a teenager’s bedroom, but is Turnbull the man to tidy it up?

After years of squabbling over climate policy, do we now have a prime minister prepared to clean up the mess? Given a fair wind at the Paris summit and an election win, Turnbull might just pull it off.
Ros Kelly was the first in a long line of federal ministers to address themselves to the question of Australia’s emissions target. AAP Image/Lee Besford

25 years ago the Australian government promised deep emissions cuts, and yet here we still are

When Australia's government first pledged to set an emission-reduction target, Jon Bon Jovi was riding high in the charts. The progress made in the 25 years since has hardly been a blaze of glory.
Chinese President Xi Jinping has announced pledged to adopt a national emissions trading scheme from 2017. EPA/MICHAEL REYNOLDS/AAP

China announces national emissions trading scheme – experts react

China, the world's biggest greenhouse emitter, will set up a national emissions trading scheme beginning in 2017. Our experts react to the announcement, made during President Xi Jinping's US state visit.
Climate diplomacy: in a another joint announcement from the US and China, president Xi Jinping committed to an emissions trading scheme in 2017. EPA/Michael Reynolds

Too big to fail: China pledges to set up landmark emissions trading scheme

Chinese President Xi Jinping has made a landmark commitment on climate change, pledging to launch what will become the world's largest and most important emissions trading scheme when it begins in 2017.
In 2010 Malcolm Turnbull threatened to cross the floor to vote for emissions trading. Polls suggest the public would back him now, even if his party won’t. AAP Image/Alan Porritt

If he wants to win an election, Turnbull should go back to his old self on climate

In backing Abbott's existing climate policy, Malcolm Turnbull looks like appeasing his party. But his prospects would be better served by appealing to voters who are anxious for strong climate action.
The Abbott government’s instinct on foreign policy is to approach it through the lens of domestic politics. AAP/Lukas Coch

Global pressures expose the limits of Australian foreign policy

The pressure the Abbott government faced over the Syrian refugee crisis hints at a broader trend. Global political dynamics are now exposing a credibility deficit in Australian foreign policy.

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