Articles on Paris Agreement

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Iron ore piles at Dampier, Western Australia. Australia could convert iron oxide to metal for export, producing it with no emissions. CHRISTIAN SPROGOE/ Rio Tinto

Australia could fall apart under climate change. But there’s a way to avoid it

Eminent economist Ross Garnaut says if climate action fails, he fears the consequences 'would be beyond contemporary Australia'. But zero-emissions iron and aluminium could be the way forward.
Indonesian residents wade through flood water near the Ciliwung river in Jakarta in February 2018. Our emissions in the near future will lock in sea level rise over centuries.

Our shameful legacy: just 15 years’ worth of emissions will raise sea level in 2300

New research confirms that what the world pumps into the atmosphere today has grave long-term consequences. Governments - especially Australia's - must urgently ramp up efforts to reduce emissions.
Renewable energy being installed at a community in the Northern Territory. Researchers have predicted Australia’s emissions are set to fall, but warn the renewables deployment rate must continue. Lucy Hughes-Jones/AAP

Some good news for a change: Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are set to fall

Australia's renewables revolution proves that there's cause for hope in our emissions reduction goals. But we cannot rest on our laurels.
Ice floe adrift in Vincennes Bay in the Australian Antarctic Territory. There are fears efforts to combat global warming will be undermined by double counting of carbon credits. AAP/Torsten Blackwood

Double counting of emissions cuts may undermine Paris climate deal

Nations are struggling to agree on how international carbon trading should work under the Paris accord. A weak result would undermine global efforts to fight climate change.
Even people who accept the science of climate change sometimes resist it because it clashes with their personal projects. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: why some people still think climate change isn’t real

People are more likely to deny climate change if they're inclined toward hierarchy, have lower levels of education or are more religious. But the strongest predictor of denial is a person's politics.
Eating less meat is one change many of us can make to reduce our contribution to climate change. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: what each of us can do to reduce our carbon footprint

Individual actions to reduce emissions are important in two ways. First, they have an immediate impact, and secondly, adopting low-carbon life choices sends a clear message to political leaders.
Aerial imagery revealing the extent of storm damage in Dee Why on Sydney’s Northern Beaches in 2016 following wild weather. NEARMAP/AAP

A landmark report confirms Australia is girt by hotter, higher seas. But there’s still time to act

The IPCC report says extreme sea level events that used to hit once a century will occur once a year in many places by 2050. This situation is inevitable, even if emissions are dramatically curbed.
Emissions are seen from an oil refinery in Alberta. (Shutterstock)

Why Canada should lead global climate action

As a wealthy nation with global diplomatic and multilateral influence, Canada is among a small subset of nations uniquely positioned to act individually and collaboratively on climate change.

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