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Articles on Psychology

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The part of the brain that regulates fear normalises 18 months after a soldier returns home, a study found. The U.S. Army

How coming home changes a soldier’s brain

Soldiers returning from combat have heightened activity in the part of the brain that regulates fear but this usually normalises…
The media does the public a disservice when it misrepresents climate change. danny birchall

Selling climate uncertainty: misinformation and the media

MEDIA & DEMOCRACY - Today, The Conversation launches a week-long series, looking at how the media influences the way our representatives develop policy. To kick off, Stephan Lewandowsky asks how media…
Obese people, on average, tend to perform worse than healthy people at planning and goal-oriented work, a literature review found. Flickr/Sculptures by Jurriaan van Hall, photo by Bart van Damme

Study links obesity with poor cognitive performance

Obese people tend to perform worse than healthy people at cognitive tasks like planning ahead, a literature review has found…
Facing up to our carbon responsibilities might make Australians happier. the waving cat/Flickr

A carbon tax is good for Australia’s mental health

Let’s face it; we just don’t like the word “tax”, do we? Such a brouhaha, such a fuss. But let’s just take a break from the group hysteria to look at the carbon tax from a few different points of view…
Problems come when bodies change and brain development doesn’t keep up. Flickr/zebra404

Twelve going on 20: are girls reaching puberty earlier?

You just have to turn on the television or catch a glimpse of a magazine newsstand to see how girls are being thrust into adulthood earlier and earlier. But does biology match societal change? Are girls…
All riots are different, but they all share similar characteristics. Facundo Arrizabalaga/EPA

Could Freud have predicted the London riots?

Three days of rioting across London since Saturday have once again raised the question of “why?”. Do riots “just happen” or is there a science, an underlying formula, that can be employed to predict and…
Go on, give us a smile. It’ll make the country a better place to be. Flickr/ToniVC

Your country needs you to be happy. Just not overly so.

Be happy for the good of your country. Happy people save more and consume less because they are concerned with the future rather than today. Their savings will be transferred into investment which is a…
Norwegians respond with love, not war, to Anders Breivik’s murderous actions. marcinlachowicz.com

The most dangerous 1,500 pages: inside the mind of Anders Breivik

The Conversation asked Professor James Jupp to read through the infamous 1,500 page manifesto of Anders Breivik. This is his analysis of the document, giving an insight into the mind of the mass murderer…

Discovery opens way to drugs for PTSD

The discovery of a brain mechanism explains why people have strong, long-lasting memories of stressful events in their lives…
You don’t have to believe what everyone tells you. jovike/Flickr

One small thing you can do for the environment: think critically

Welcome to “One small thing …”. We asked our authors what one small thing they, or you, could do for the environment. We’ll bring their answers to you on Friday afternoons. Today’s one small thing comes…
The lawyer for the self-confessed Norway killer, Anders Breivik will enter a plea of insanity AFP photo/Facebook - Youtube.

The lone mad man? Breivik’s lunacy label stops vital questions

Societies, if we are to take the Freudian line, prefer to subordinate chaotic urges in favour of dull order. Civilization implies stability. By the nineteenth century, human society was digesting a range…
Looks the same to me… our personal experiences are not the best indicators of change. P León/flickr

Climate change, personal experience and the vagaries of memory

We see it in the media all the time. Regular beachgoers who see no evidence for sea-level rise, farmers trusting long-term experience over Bureau of Meteorology forecasting, Antarctic sea-captains whose…
Humans instinctively copy their opponents’ gestures during rock-paper-scissors, a study found. Flickr/arloguthrie

How not to win at rock-paper-scissors

Humans instinctively copy their opponents while playing rock, paper, scissors, suggesting the urge to imitate others is deeply…

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