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Articles on Psychology research

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Even young children are very aware of whether they’re getting their fair share. Jupiterimages/PHOTOS.com via Getty Images Plus

Selfish or selfless? Human nature means you’re both

Cognitive neuroscientists use brain imaging and behavioral economic games to investigate people's sense of fairness. They find it's common to take care of yourself before looking out for others.
Self-isolation can be boring and lonely. Annie Spratt/Unsplash

Porn use is up, thanks to the pandemic

Online pornography is one business that's booming during the coronavirus pandemic. A psychology researcher explains its pull and whether there are likely to be longer-term effects of this surge in use.
Have some healthy skepticism when you encounter images online. tommaso79/Stock via Getty Images Plus

Out-of-context photos are a powerful low-tech form of misinformation

Images without context or presented with text that misrepresents what they show can be a powerful tool of misinformation, especially since photos make statements seem more believable.
Imitation is the sincerest form of being human? Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.com

Being copycats might be key to being human

A quirk of psychology that affects the way people learn from others may have helped unlock the complicated technologies and rituals that human culture hinges on.
Your cold, hard list is no match for hot emotions. Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

A rational checklist is no match for emotions in matters of the heart

A cold, logical list of attributes sought in a partner is cast aside by the hot emotions that come up in real life. A psychology researcher explains how this 'hot-cold empathy gap' works in dating.
Inflammatory words can prime a mind. Elijah O'Donnell/Unsplash

Hearing hate speech primes your brain for hateful actions

A new theory of language suggests that people understand words by unconsciously simulating what they describe. Repeated exposure – and the simulation that comes with it – makes it easier to act.
You’re probably wrong about how long it would take you to know they’re ‘the one.’ rawpixel/Unsplash

You make decisions quicker and based on less information than you think

New research confirms that people tend to rush to judgment, in spite of believing their own decisions and those of others are carefully based on lots of evidence and data. And that can be good or bad.
Volunteering at a food bank is one way people feel rewarded by giving. AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

When you’re grateful, your brain becomes more charitable

How does being thankful about things in your own life relate to any selfless concern you may have about the well-being of others? A neuroscientist explores the gratitude/altruism connection.

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