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Articles on Social determinants of health

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Instead of returning to “normal” after the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada should adopt a health-care system that focuses on prevention and the social determinants of health. (Pixabay, Canva)

No ‘back to normal’ after COVID-19: Health care should shift focus from treatment to prevention

COVID-19 has shown the flaws of a reactive health-care system designed to care for people who are already sick. A preventive approach would be more equitable, less expensive and keep us healthier.
Mental health issues resulting from COVID-19 and efforts to contain it are the fourth wave of the pandemic. (Pixabay, Canva)

Mental health impact of coronavirus pandemic hits marginalized groups hardest

The pandemic's mental health toll is not distributed equally. Its impact is disproportionately felt by racialized groups, Indigenous Peoples, people with disabilities and those experiencing poverty.
People exercising in Ellis Park in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dino Lloyd/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africans must be healthier for universal healthcare to succeed

South Africa faces high levels of noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The NHI is likely to battle to cope with treating large numbers of sick people.
Protesters in São Paulo declare ‘Black Lives Matter’ at a June 7 protest spurred by both U.S. anti-racist protests and the coronavirus’s heavy toll on black Brazilians. Marcello Zambrana/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians, a legacy of structural racism that dates back to slavery

In Brazil, black COVID-19 patients are dying at higher rates than white patients. Worse housing quality, working conditions and health care help to explain the pandemic's racially disparate toll.
Ladijane Sofia da Concecão, one of millions of unemployed housekeepers in Brazil, accepts a food donation from a friend in São Paulo, May 7, 2020. Alexandre Schneider/Getty Images

In Brazil’s raging pandemic, domestic workers fear for their lives – and their jobs

Maids were among Brazil's earliest COVID-19 victims, infected by employers who had been to Italy. Now 39% of Brazilian 'domésticas' have been let go, most without severance or sick leave.
Walpiri Transient Camp, Katherine: Western medicine can’t be expected to work for disadvantaged Indigenous Australians unless housing and social disadvantage are also addressed.

How a rethink of emergency care is closing the gap, one person at a time

A safe home, a working fridge and access to transport are all needed before western medicine has a chance of working in the long term. But a new way of providing care can help.
Young adults and people living in the inner city are among those most likely to be lonely, according to the ABC’s Australia Talks project. from www.shutterstock.com

Loneliness is a social cancer, every bit as alarming as cancer itself

Loneliness is a bigger cause of death than a poor diet, obesity, alcohol consumption, and lack of exercise, and it's on a par with heavy smoking. So let's get talking about it.
The mother’s education level is also a factor. Brainsil/Shutterstock

These 3 factors predict a child’s chance of obesity in adolescence (and no, it’s not just their weight)

One in four Australians is overweight or obese by the time they reach adolescence, but it's difficult to predict who is at risk. These three questions can help.
Researchers are testing an equity-based model in emergency departments, mental health agencies and hospital units. (Shutterstock)

Equity in health care improves people’s health

When care is equity-oriented, patients report fewer depression and trauma symptoms, less chronic pain and improved quality of life.
In poorer communities, shared spaces tend to be poorly maintained and utilitarian. from shutterstock.com

Our urban environment doesn’t only reflect poverty, it amplifies it

We wear our surroundings like a cloak. Lower-income communities often live in environments that discourage healthy, outdoor activities. This perpetuates their poorer health and traps them in poverty.
Australia needs policies that capitalise on the strengths of people with disability. www.shutterstock.com

People with disability have a lot to offer employers

Instead of trying to help people with disability overcome their limitations, we should be harnessing their strengths in the workplace. This will improve their health and mental well-being.
An infection prevention and control professional wipes her gloves with a bleach wipe during an ebola virus training in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Explainer: How we all benefit from the public health system

Infectious diseases pose a continual threat to Canadians. Ensuring the population stays healthy requires increasing investment in our public health system.

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