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Articles on US Congress

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Vice President Mike Pence says he ‘welcomes’ objections to Biden’s Electoral College win, but House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other House Democrats reject any such effort. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Why Trump’s Senate supporters can’t overturn Electoral College results they don’t like – here’s how the law actually works

The 1887 Electoral Count Act spells out the process for Congress to convene and review election results on Jan. 6, and it requires both the House and Senate to uphold any challenges to Biden’s win.
Prison education programs have been shown to improve job prospects. Thinkstock/Getty Images

Congress lifts long-standing ban on Pell grants to people in prison

For the first time since 1994, incarcerated individuals can get federal aid to pay for college. A prison education scholar explains how higher education helps those who have run afoul of the law.
U.S. Reps. Jahana Hayes and Lauren Underwood attend the first day of the 116th Congress in January 2019. Both won reelection in 2020. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Black candidates can win in swing districts

Evidence shows Black candidates can win elections in majority-white congressional districts.
If the House of Representatives selects the president, each state would get a single vote – not one vote per House member. iStock/Getty

Congress could select the president in a disputed election

Judges are generally reluctant to decide elections, as the Supreme Court controversially did in 2000. As a result, Trump’s flurry of litigation could wind up throwing the election to the House.
Women like congressional candidate Cori Bush from Missouri face greater obstacles than white men when trying to reach political office. Getty Images for Supermajority

How ‘strategic’ bias keeps Americans from voting for women and candidates of color

Women and people of color continue to appear on ballots less often than white men, and that, in part, is due to concerns by American voters that others will not view these candidates as electable.
Richard Nixon, celebrating his election on Nov. 7, 1968, campaigned against a backdrop of racial inequality, civic unrest and polarized politics. AFP via Getty Images

1968’s presidential election looks a lot like today’s – but it was very different

There are similarities between the law-and-order language used by the 1968 and 2020 presidential candidates and the racial tension and political polarization both years. But much is different.
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks via video link during the second day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Oct. 13, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

How the Supreme Court can maintain its legitimacy amid intensifying partisanship

Though critics claim Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination jeopardizes the high court’s legitimacy, research shows there are ways the judiciary can bolster its standing and weather controversial decisions.
Donald Trump’s current term as president began on Jan. 20, 2017. It will end on Jan. 20, 2021, with the start of a new term – for him, or someone else. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

President Trump’s term ends on Jan. 20 – the Constitution is clear

The framers of the Constitution were very clear that presidential terms have time limits. Not four years and a day. Not three years and 364 days. Four years.
Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in Oct. 12 for her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Leah Millis/Pool via AP

The history of oath ceremonies and why they matter when taking office

Taking oath is an important tradition before assuming charge of a public office. It entails a commitment to the future. What is the history of oath-taking?
If the House of Representatives selects the president, each state would get a single vote – not one vote per House member. iStock / Getty Images Plus

How Congress could decide the 2020 election

Biden and Trump are both preparing for a court battle in November. But when the Electoral College produces no clear winner, it’s the House of Representatives that’s supposed to select the president.
DACA supporters rally at the Supreme Court on Thursday, June 18, 2020, after the court rejected the Trump administration’s push to end DACA. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

It’s still a conservative Supreme Court, even after recent liberal decisions – here’s why

Those who say the Supreme Court’s last term was a liberal success fail to understand that the types of decisions they see as victories are fleeting triumphs that will not endure.

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