Articles on Women in STEM

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A 19-year-old first-year student from Promoting Opportunities for Women in Engineering at McGill addresses Grade 11 students in 2017 in Montréal. Progress has been made to encourage more women to study STEM since the Montréal Massacre in 1989. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Montréal Massacre, 30 years later: My experience as a woman in engineering

Engineering is in a better place than in 1989. More women are studying the field, and academic administrators and managers want to hire female engineers. But more work is still needed.
After 117 years, a third woman won a physics Nobel. Alexander Mahmoud, © Nobel Media AB 2018

Why don’t more women win science Nobels?

Progress has been made toward gender parity in science fields. But explicit and implicit barriers still hold women back from advancing in the same numbers as men to the upper reaches of STEM academia.
Global collaborations between the political and educational sectors aim to address the challenges faced by women scientists. Shutterstock

Global collaborations are changing conditions for women in STEM

Academic partnerships with diplomats, industry leaders and others, can provide a comprehensive approach to addressing the challenges faced by women in STEM.
Only two women are in this photo from the 2018 Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science award night: Minister Karen Andrews, and 2018 Life Scientist awardee Lee Burger. Prime Minister’s Prizes for Science, Commonwealth Department of Industry, Innovation and Science

Women in STEM need your support – and Australia needs women in STEM

You can support career development by nominating a deserving scientist, innovator or science teacher for recognition through a prize or award.
Women have contributed to some of the biggest discoveries in the life sciences, but remain under-acknowledged. Shutterstock

Closing the gender gap in the life sciences is an uphill struggle

Women have made life-changing research discoveries in the life sciences. Their achievements need to be recognized in order to increase future discoveries by women scientists.
More must be done to draw women into STEM careers. Burlingham/Shutterstock

Want to be a woman in science? Here’s advice from those who’ve gone before

Women are drastically under-represented in the science, technology, engineering and maths fields.
A number of initiatives for Australian women in STEM got off the ground in 2018. Tim Gouw/unsplash

New awards, new ambassador: Australian women in STEM look to 2019

The Athena Swan charter commits research institutions to create a gender inclusive workplace, through taking action and being held accountable. 15 Australian institutions are now bronze awardees.
Only 3 percent of these prizes have gone to women since 1901. Reuters/Pawel Kopczynski

Why more women don’t win science Nobels

Progress has been made toward gender parity in science fields. But explicit and implicit barriers still hold women back from advancing in the same numbers as men to the upper reaches of STEM academia.

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