Nathan Chen of the United States, considered a gold medal contender, falls while performing during the men’s short program figure skating at the 2018 Winter Olympics. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Why favourites fail: explaining the Olympic ‘choke’

Why can an athlete dominate their sport, but fail to perform when it counts most at the Olympic Games? A number of factors the viewing audience can't see can explain poor performances.
Members of a North Korean delegation cheer while holding the unified Korea flag at the pairs figure skating free program at the Pyeonchang Winter Olympics on Feb. 15, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

North Korean Sport Diplomacy: The Olympic event where everyone loses

The International Olympic Committee has banished dopers from the Winter Games. Shame it hasn't treated North Korea, a noted human rights violator, with the same resolve.
Scotty James became the second Australian in Winter Olympic history to win a medal in the snowboard halfpipe event. EPA/Fazry Ismail

What makes a winning halfpipe snowboarder like Scotty James?

Halfpipe snowboarders like Scotty James may seem laid-back and relaxed, but they are subjected to high physical load and fatigue induced by training and competition.
What makes the mogul discipline distinctive is that it is both a judged event and a timed event. EPA/Sergei Ilnitsky

What makes a winning mogul skier like Matt Graham?

Matt Graham’s silver medal in mogul skiing is the third time an Australian has won a medal in the event at a Winter Olympics.
Harley Windsor’s visibility before, during and after these Winter Olympics may just be the catalyst to inspire future generations of Indigenous athletes. AAP/Brendan Esposito

In Harley Windsor, Australia has its first Indigenous Winter Olympian – why has it taken so long?

While Harley Windsor’s selection deserves celebration, it’s surprising that it has taken until now for an Indigenous Australian to compete at a Winter Olympics.
Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lead Team Canada into the stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-COC, Jason Ransom

Athletes are the most important part of the Olympics. Or are they?

It would seem obvious athletes are the most important part of the Olympics. But competing issues, from sponsorship rules to politics, means the rights of athletes aren't always the top priority.
Sporting events like the Winter Olympics are one of TV’s most valuable products. Reuters/Fabrizio Bensch

Live from Pyeongchang: how an Olympic broadcast works

Olympics have often provided the impetus for large-scale broadcasting innovations, such as when TV was introduced in Australia to broadcast the 1956 Games.

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