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Articles sur Australian history

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‘Peace for our time’: British prime minister Neville Chamberlain displaying the Anglo-German declaration, known as the Munich Agreement, in September 1938. Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis via Getty Images

Are we learning the wrong lessons from history?

Oversimplified versions of the past lead to bad political decisions.
Tracker Nat, holding his hat on the far left, with Paul Hasluck standing next to him, holding Nat’s shield in this picture from 1958. National Archives of Australia. NAA: A1200, L28199.

Rediscovering the art of Tracker Nat: ‘the Namatjira of carving’

During the 1950s, Nat made hundreds of carvings. Today, many of these are likely to be lying unidentified in people’s homes and in museum basements.
A Pacific island woman with a child planting sugar cane in a field, Bingara, Queensland, c 1897. John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.

Friday essay: ‘I said no’ – Nie’s refusal and the troubling question of Pacific slavery in Australia

In 1881, a Pacific Islander woman brought here to work on a sugar cane plantation ran away. She was violently retrieved by her employer. Her story sheds moving light on a dark history of exploitation.
Eugene von Guérard, Mount Kosciusko, seen from the Victorian border (Mount Hope Ranges) 1866. National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne Purchased, 1870 Photo: National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

Mount Kosciuszko: how Australia’s highest peak came to be named for a freedom fighter against Russian aggression

Tadeusz Kościuszko was a revolutionary thinker who was Commander in Chief of the Polish-Lithuanian armed forces.

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