Articles sur Obesity

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The gut microbiome is the community of micro-organisms living inside the gastrointestinal tract, which performs many beneficial functions, including educating the immune system. (Shutterstock))

Gut reaction: How the gut microbiome may influence the severity of COVID-19

The disease is more severe in people with obesity, diabetes and hypertension — all conditions linked to changes in the gut microbiome.
A woman uses her feet to pull herself along in a wheelchair among cherry blossoms at a homeless camp at Oppenheimer Park in Vancouver in April 2020 that was recently evaculated due to COVID-19. The coronavirus has exposed and fed upon other societal issues in true ‘syndemic’ fashion. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

The coronavirus doesn’t exist in isolation — it feeds on other diseases, crises

When two or more epidemics co-exist and compound one another to worsen health, they are said to be syndemic. COVID-19 is feeding on other crises and diseases.
The Daily Mile gets children out of the classroom for fifteen minutes every day to run or jog, at their own pace. The Daily Mile

Running a mile a day can make children healthier – here’s how schools can make it more fun

From obstacle courses to playing music, school children give their thoughts on how to make a daily run more exciting.
Two new studies have found a link between having antibiotics as a baby and an increased risk of obesity in childhood. From shutterstock.com

The link between antibiotics and obesity in children doesn’t mean you need to avoid antibiotics

New research finds taking antibiotics in early life is associated with an increased risk of obesity at age four. But that's no reason not to give your child antibiotics if they really need them.
Come school holidays, your school-aged kids are more likely to spend longer on their screens than they do in term time. Here’s how to get them outside and active, with a bit of planning. from www.shutterstock.com

4 ways to get your kids off the couch these summer holidays

The average Australian school kid spends more time watching TV or gaming and less time being active over their summer holidays. Could more chores be the answer?
The teenage brain has a voracious drive for reward, diminished behavioural control and a susceptibility to be shaped by experience. This often manifests as a reduced ability to resist high-calorie junk foods. (Shutterstock)

How junk food shapes the developing teenage brain

Excessively eating junk foods during adolescence could alter brain development, leading to lasting poor diet habits. But, like a muscle, the brain can be exercised to improve willpower.

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