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Articles sur Sixth mass extinction

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Rapid loss of species like these Spix’s macaws, considered extinct in the wild, may represent the sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history. PATRICK PLEUL/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we’ve mapped the key places to do it

A new plan targets areas around the world that can store carbon and protect large numbers of species. It calls for preserving these lands, working with Indigenous peoples and connecting wild areas.
Are cats really to blame for the worldwide loss of biodiversity? Dzurag/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Don’t blame cats for destroying wildlife – shaky logic is leading to moral panic

Framing cats as responsible for declines in biodiversity is based on faulty scientific logic and fails to account for the real culprit – human activity.
A phytoplankton bloom stretching across the Barents Sea off the coast of mainland Europe’s most northern point. European Space Agency

Ocean ecosystems take two million years to recover after mass extinction – new research

Populations of plankton are in decline. If we push this critical foundation of the marine food chain to extinction, we could cripple ecosystems for millions of years.
Dinosaurs had some bad luck, but sooner or later extinction comes for all of us. rawpixel/Unsplash.com

What makes some species more likely to go extinct?

Death is inevitable for individuals and also for species. With help from the fossil record, paleontologists are piecing together what might make one creature more vulnerable than another.
The extinction of dinosaurs is one of the many periods of mass extinctions on earth. www.shutterstrock.com/Jaroslav Moravcik

5 periods of mass extinction on Earth. Are we entering the sixth?

Scientists believe since 2010 we have entered the sixth period of mass extinction. CO2 emissions will change the lives of plants and animals in the next three to four decades.
Nearly one-third of tropical animal species face extinction if humans do not curb our growing appetites for beef, pork and other land-intensive meats. The Panamanian golden frog bred by the Vancouver Aquarium in this 2014 file photo may be extinct in its natural habitat. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How changing your diet could save animals from extinction

As much as one-third of animal species in the tropics could be eradicated if their habitats continue to be converted for monoculture farming. We can all do something to make a difference.

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