Articles sur US Constitution

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When is the right time to wave the green flag? Yellow Dog Productions/Getty Images

Who’s in charge of lifting lockdowns?

Federal authorities have input, but states reign supreme – unless they decide to let local governments make the call.
Donald Trump at a press briefing with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force on April 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. Sarah Silbiger/AFP

Donald Trump’s ‘Chinese virus’: the politics of naming

An analysis of the expressions used by Donald Trump to designate Covid-19 sheds light on his political calculations and on the evolution of his relationship with China in recent weeks.
Milwaukee voters wait in a social-distancing line, some wearing masks, before voting in the state’s spring elections on April 7. AP Photo/Morry Gash

Why the Supreme Court made Wisconsin vote during the coronavirus crisis

The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has reversed its decadeslong practice of protecting voters' rights and removing barriers to casting ballots.
The Justice Department is investigating stock trades made by Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) after a briefing on the coronavirus. Getty/Mark Wilson

Burr steps down as Senate Intel Committee head because of FBI investigation, but insider trading by him and others in Congress still difficult to prove

Did members of Congress illegally sell stocks after getting inside information about the pandemic from federal officials? A former lawyer for the House says proving such cases is very difficult.
Together no more: remote voting for Congress could be the outcome of public health restrictions on gatherings. House of Representatives

Coronavirus restrictions likely to lead to remote voting for Congress

Democrats may soon propose letting members of Congress vote by proxy during the pandemic. A legal scholar says the language the Founders used 233 years ago could allow voting remotely.
Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, at a Senate GOP lunch meeting on March 20, 2020, to discuss the ‘phase 3’ coronavirus stimulus bill. Getty/ Drew Angerer

How one federal agency took care of its workers during the yellow fever pandemic in the 1790s

Today's coronavirus pandemic has echoes in the yellow fever pandemic of the 1790s. Then, as now, workers struggled with how to support themselves and their families. One federal agency had the answer.
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presided over the Senate during President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper/Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has actually tied in an impeachment trial – twice

In 1868, during the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the Senate tied on two votes. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase broke both ties.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., during debate over rules for the Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump, Jan. 21, 2020. Senate Television via AP

Precedent? Nah, the Senate gets to reinvent its rules in every impeachment

Certain words are being used over and over during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. One of them is 'precedent.' What does it really mean?
In an official White House photo, President Donald Trump stands alone. Shealah Craighead/White House

Trump, like Obama, tests the limits of presidential war powers

Both President Trump and President Obama used military force without informing Congress, or getting its approval. But the differences reveal more than the similarities.
Republican lawmakers are seen as Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) oversees a vote on the second article of impeachment against President Donald Trump in the House of Representatives, Dec. 18, 2019. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Congressional Republicans abandon constitutional heritage and Watergate precedents in defense of Trump

An expert on Watergate says that today's House Republicans have taken precisely the opposite position than the GOP took in 1974 on the president's power to withhold documents from Congress.
Top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine William Taylor, left, and Foreign Service officer George Kent are sworn in before the House Intelligence Committee during the first public impeachment hearing. AP/Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Photo

Impeachment: Two quotes that defined the first day of public hearings

The first day of public impeachment testimony was defined, in part, by strongly worded statements from Representatives Adam Schiff and Devin Nunes.
The Capitol on the morning after Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced the House of Representatives will vote on a resolution to affirm the impeachment investigation. AP/J. Scott Applewhite

Impeachment resolution: 3 reasons the House voted even though the Constitution doesn’t require it

The House of Representatives voted Thursday on a resolution that laid out a process for the inquiry into the impeachment of President Donald Trump. But was the resolution constitutionally necessary?

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