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Articles sur Vaccine safety

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A lab technician holds a vial of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate during testing at the Chula Vaccine Research Center, run by Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand on May 25, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Explainer: How clinical trials test COVID-19 vaccines

Will a vaccine for COVID-19 be safe? Animal testing, human clinical trials and post-approval surveillance give us good grounds to believe that a future approved vaccine will work and be safe.
On Aug. 11, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that a coronavirus vaccine developed in the country has been registered for use. Russian Health Ministry/Handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A COVID-19 vaccine needs the public’s trust – and it’s risky to cut corners on clinical trials, as Russia is

As Russia fast tracks a coronavirus vaccine, scientists worry about skipped safety checks – and the potential fallout for trust in vaccines if something ends up going wrong.
A scientist holding a coronavirus vaccine at the Nikolai Gamaleya National Center of Epidemiology and Microbiology in Moscow, Russia. Alexander Zemlianichenko Jr/Russian Direct Investment Fund/AP/AAP

Russia’s coronavirus vaccine hasn’t been fully tested. Doling it out risks side effects and false protection

If the vaccine does not protect individuals from infection, those who have been vaccinated could falsely believe they are protected.
If another parent at playgroup says she’s not vaccinating her child, what’s the best way to respond? from www.shutterstock.com

4 ways to talk with vaccine skeptics

Responding to someone who questions vaccination can be difficult. Before you react, it pays to assess the situation because weighing in can do more harm than good.
Human challenge studies can be useful to test new vaccines and are increasingly being used internationally. Yet there are several ethical issues to consider. from www.shutterstock.com

Infecting healthy people in vaccine research can be ethical and necessary

Deliberately infecting people with a disease-causing agent as part of carefully considered medical research can be ethically acceptable or even necessary.
Signs from a protest in 2015 against a California bill that prohibits parents from using a religious exemption as a reason to not vaccinate their children. The bill became law. AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

Anti-vaccination beliefs don’t follow the usual political polarization

Opposition to vaccines still prevents many children from getting needed preventative care. Understanding who is opposed, and why, can help, but the answers may surprise you.
For some parents, the decision to vaccinate requires more than just objective evidence. rocketboom/flickr

Australians’ attitudes to vaccination are more complex than a simple ‘pro’ or ‘anti’ label

Whilst most parents do vaccinate, health professionals often find it difficult to talk with those who are hesitant or decline. A new resource provides information and communication support.

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