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Articles on Colombia

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Women compete in the 20-kilometre race walk at the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2016. (Shutterstock)

How sport transformed the lives of young Colombians

A Colombian program to help disadvantaged youth used sport to help them steer clear of the dangers they faced on a daily basis, including violence, prostitution, drug addiction, vandalism and gangs.
Olmedo Vega spent 35 years as a FARC guerrilla commander before moving to the Agua Bonita demobilisation camp. Photograph: Juan Pablo Valderrama

Inside a reintegration camp for Colombia’s ex-guerrilla fighters: ‘Words of reconciliation are our only weapons now’

The outcome of Colombia’s presidential election has major implications for the survival of its historic peace deal, and the prospects of former combatants who have committed to a life without conflict
Presidential candidate Gustavo Petro, centre and his running mate Francia Marquez, at his right, stand before supporters with Marquez’s wife and daughter on election night in Bogota, Colombia. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

The left could be poised to take power in Colombia for the first time

The strong showing of left-wing presidential candidate Gustavo Petro in the Colombian elections suggests the country’s left-right divide is moving from armed confrontation to democratic disagreement.
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia members stand in southwestern Colombia on January 17, 2017. These FARC soldiers were among the 5,700 fighters who demobilized after the 2016 peace agreement. Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images

US has taken FARC off its terrorist list, giving insight into Biden’s foreign policy

The U.S. State Department rarely removes terrorist groups from its Foreign Terrorist Organizations list. Most terrorist groups, unlike the Colombian FARC, don’t want to put down their weapons.
Disappeared: relatives protest at the headquarters of the Special Jurisdiction for Peace in Bogota, Colombia, August 2021. EPA-EFE/Mauricio Duenas Castaneda

The science that is helping researchers find the ‘disappeared’ in Latin America

Researchers are using modern forensic techniques to find the bodies of victims of civil conflict in Latin America.
An Argentine justice crusader who calls himself Menganno has been patrolling the streets of the city of Lanus since 2010. Netflix has now picked up his character. Netflix Latinoamérica (screenshot)

How Latin America’s protest superheroes fight injustice and climate change – and sometimes crime, too

In Latin America, common citizens have often donned outlandish outfits and comic book-inspired personas to lead demonstrations and promote social change.
Protesters attend an anti-government march at Plaza Bolivar in Bogota, Colombia, where citizens have taken to the streets for weeks after proposed tax increases and to decry police brutality. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Why Colombians are taking to the streets to protest state violence

The Colombian government responded violently to a general strike over tax reforms that primarily affected working-class citizens. It has fueled calls for police reform.
A demonstration for peace in Buenaventura, Colombia, where a cartel turf war has left at least 30 people dead since the beginning of this year. Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images

Colombian city beset by crime declares ‘Black Lives Matter’

A lethal turf war between drug traffickers has terrorized Buenaventura, Colombia for months. Now protesters are demanding the government’s help to protect people in this mostly Black city.
Death in Rio: security forces patrol the Jacarezinho favela the day after 25 people were killed in a drugs operation on May 6 2021. EPA-EFE/Andre Coelho

Drugs ‘trilemma’: how to halt the deadly trade while still ensuring development and peace

Attempts to wage war on drugs in developing countries which don’t take into account the needs of local people are doomed to fail. Here’s why.

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